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Administrative Actions

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expand Issuing Year : 2022 ‎(3)
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Denise Cason22-002
During the course of her employment as Case Management Specialist II, Department for Community Based Services, Jefferson Service Region, Cabinet for Health and Family Services Ms. Cason was charged with 4 counts of violating the Executive Branch Code of Ethics.  Specifically, Ms. Cason was charged with multiple counts of fraud through intentional fabrication of state paperwork that resulted in the issuance of EBT and SNAP benefits.  She then engaged in conduct to steal those same EBT and SNAP benefits for personal benefit and the benefit of her friends.  Furthermore, she failed to perform her job duties and used state time, programs, and equipment for personal benefit.
Ms. Cason admitted to the conduct during a recorded interview with her agency’s investigators.  Contact was attempted with Ms. Cason and her counsel. Initiating Order was mailed Certified and returned UNCLAIMED, and a separate attempt through First Class USPS was made and the letter was not returned.  The Commission moved to issue a Final Order of Default in which Ms. Cason received a public reprimand, is ordered to pay a fine of  $5,000 per count (4) and submit the fine within 30 days of the entry of the Final Order.  Ms. Cason retains the right to appeal the Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Jennie Fisk22-001
Ms. Fisk admitted to two (2) counts of violating the Code of Ethics. During her employment as a Paralegal for the Department of Public Advocacy, Ms. Fisk admitted that from June 2018 through February 2020 she used her agency's confidential, unrecorded phone line, which was designated for official purposes, to have personal conversations with her son, who was not a client of her agency. During May 2018 through May 2019, Fisk engaged in over 250 phone calls with her son. During May 2019 through February 2020, Fisk engaged in over 150 calls with her son. Fisk spent approximately 45 hours of state work time on these personal calls with her son. Fisk engaged in personal conversations with her son during work hours with the benefit of using an unrecorded line. Ms. Fisk further admitted that from June 2018 through February 2020, she used her access to an agency database to assist her son and one other inmate in discovering confidential information about other inmates, including bed locations within the state's correctional facilities.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Ms. Fisk agreed to pay a $1,500 civil penalty.   The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. William Fay21-006
Mr. Fay admitted to one (1) count of violating the Code of Ethics. Mr. Fay admitted that he used his position as a Correctional Officer at the Kentucky State Penitentiary, and his access to a state correctional facility to introduce narcotics to inmates of the facility in exchange for money. Fay did so to fulfill his own private, for-profit interests, which conflicted with his duties in the public interest. Fay used his position and access to inmates to engage in conduct that was criminal in nature in violation of law and his agency’s policies. By engaging in such conduct, Fay failed to avoid conduct that would lead the public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his own private interest.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, the Commission took into account the criminal penalties issued against Mr. Fay. Mr. Fay agreed to pay the Commission a $500 civil penalty and to never again seek employment with the state. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
expand Issuing Year : 2021 ‎(8)
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Brittany Cook21-002
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Ms. Cook admitted to three (3) counts of violating the Code of Ethics. Specifically, during April, May, and June of 2019 while employed as an Administrative Specialist for the Division of Motor Vehicle Licensing, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Ms. Cook used her position to engage in conduct to improperly process rebuilt title  applications for applicants at the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet One Stop Shop, thereby providing those applicants with an advantage.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Ms. Cook must pay a $1,500.00 civil penalty  and receive a public reprimand. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Eric McKee21-001
In a Final Order of Default, the Commission charged Eric McKee, an Administrative Specialist, Department of Vehicle Regulation, Transportation Cabinet, with three counts of violating the Executive Branch Code of Ethics.  Specifically, during May, June, and July of 2019, Mr. McKee improperly processed 403 rebuilt title applications for applicants. The applications were not properly logged into the One Stop Shop, which allowed the applications to bypass the One Stop Shop policy of having only one application processed per person, per day. 
Pursuant to the Final Order of Default, Mr. McKee must pay a $3,000.00 civil penalty and receive a public reprimand.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Joseph Sanders21-010
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Sanders, while serving as a Highway Superintendent I, Department of Highways, Transportation Cabinet , admitted to two (2) counts of violating the Code of Ethics and admitted to using his access to a state vehicle and state time to travel to a medical appointment for personal reasons. Further, Mr. Sanders admitted to using his access to a state vehicle and state time to travel to a private business to spend approximately 13 hours over a two-week period socializing with employees of the business when Sanders had no work-related reason for being at the business or remaining at the business for hours at a time.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Sanders paid a $4,000 civil penalty.   The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Leroy Buckner21-004
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Buckner admitted to  two (2) counts of violating the Code of Ethics and accepted a no-contest settlement to one (1)  count. Specifically, in his position as a State Park Ranger Captain for the Department of Parks, TAH Cabinet, Buckner failed to accurately report his work time and received credit for more hours than he actually worked, and used his state assigned vehicle for personal reasons.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Buckner paid a $3,000   civil penalty. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Lindsay Blevins21-003
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Ms. Blevins admitted to three (3) counts of violating the Code of Ethics. Specifically, from June through August of 2020, while employed as a Unit Supervisor for Luther Luckett Facility, Department of Corrections, JPS Cabinet, Blevins engaged in an inappropriate relationship with an inmate through the Department of Corrections’ JPay system.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Ms. Blevins paid a $3,000    civil penalty. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Mary Vogel20-020
In a Final Order of Default, the Commission found Ms. Vogel to have violated one (1) counts in violation of the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, during July of 2019, while serving as a Correctional Officer at  Roederer Complex, Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, Ms. Vogel used  her position to engage in an inappropriate relationship with an inmate, including using the Department of Corrections’ JPay system to engage in inappropriate communications with the inmate.  Vogel did so to fulfill her own prurient interest.
Pursuant to the Final Order of Default, Ms. Vogel must pay a $1,000 civil penalty and receive a public reprimand.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Sammy Carroll20-018
In a Final Order of Default, the Commission found Mr. Carroll to have violated three (3) counts in violation of the Code of Ethics. Specifically, during April, May, and June of  2019 while employed as a Highway Technician I, Department of Highways, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Mr. Carroll used his state-issued fuel card to purchase fuel for his personal vehicle.
Pursuant to the Final Order of Default, Mr. Carroll must pay a $3,000.00 civil penalty and receive a public reprimand.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Shannon Anson21-005
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Ms. Anson admitted to twenty-three (23) counts of violating the Code of Ethics. Specifically, in her position as a Social Service Specialist with the Department of Juvenile Justice, JPS Cabinet, from August 2013 through July 2015, on twenty-three (23) separate occasions Ms. Anson used her official position to corruptly accept payments totally approximately $50,500 from various individuals at a non- profit corporation organized under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Anson accepted the payments in return for placing youth under the supervision of the Department of Juvenile Justice with the non-profit corporation pursuant to a contract between the non-profit corporation and the Department of Juvenile Justice.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Ms. Anson agreed to pay a civil penalty of forty-six thousand dollars ($46,000). However, this amount will be completely offset by the criminal restitution to be paid by Ms. Anson. Further, Ms. Anson agreed to abstain from ever again seeking employment with  the Executive Branch of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
expand Issuing Year : 2020 ‎(24)
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v.  Tellia Warf19-013
Ms. Warf admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, during the course of her employment while serving as an Office Support Assistant I for the Department of Parks, Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet, Ms. Warf used state time to sew quilts, which she sold for personal profit. 
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Ms. Warf agreed to pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Amber McDowell18-022
Specifically, during May, June, and July of 2017, McDowell used her position as the Administrative Secretary to the Board of Hairdressers and Cosmetologists, Public Protection Cabinet,  to improperly issue up to thirty-eight (38) out-of-state transfer licenses for hairdressers, cosmetologists, nail technicians, and estheticians.  Ms. McDowell issued the licenses without verifying that the applicants were actually licensed in another state and without receiving all necessary documentation. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Ms. McDowell agreed to pay a $6,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Charles Long20-015
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Long admitted to three (3) counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, during the course of his employment as a Maintenance Section Supervisor, KY School for the Deaf, Department of Education, Mr. Long used his state assigned vehicle for personal reasons during August, September, and October of 2019. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Long agreed to pay a $3,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waive any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Cherl "Rena" Richardson20-022
During the course of her employment as an Alternative Sentencing Worker III, Department of Public Advocacy, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, Ms. Richardson admitted to three (3) counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, Ms. Richardson used her official position to have an inappropriate relationship with an inmate using the facility’s inmate communication systems. 


 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Ms. Richardson agreed to pay a $3,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waive any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Chester Griffith20-016
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Griffith admitted to two (2) counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, during his employment as a Maintenance Section Supervisor at the Carl D. Perkins Vocational Training Center, Mr. Griffith used state time, property, and personnel for use in his for profit business and for personal use. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Griffith agreed to pay a $2,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waive any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Chris Slone20-012
During the course of his employment as a Transportation Engineering Branch Manager, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Mr. Slone admitted to two (2) counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, Mr. Slone accepted gifts, in the form of basketball tickets, totaling in value of more than $25 in a calendar year from a contractor or consultant of his agency. 
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Slone agreed to pay a $500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Cortez Bowling19-021
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Bowling admitted to two counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, during January 2019, Bowling used his state position and access to a state-owned vehicle for his own personal use and benefit, and claimed work time to which he was not entitled.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Bowling agreed to pay a $2,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. David Thacker20-019
In a Final Order of Default, the Commission found Mr. Thacker to have violated two (2) counts of the Code of Ethics.  Specifically during 2019 as an employee of the Department of Parks, Tourism, Arts, and Heritage Cabinet, Mr. Thacker engaged in an inappropriate relationship on state time and on state property.  Thacker did so to fulfill his own prurient interest. Furthermore, Thacker used his official position to engage in the inappropriate relationship with a subordinate employee.   
Pursuant to the Final Order of Default, Mr. Thacker must pay a $2,500.00 civil penalty per count for a total fine of $5,000 and receive a public reprimand. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Delbert Collett20-003
Collett admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, as a Lieutenant with the Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, Collett falsified agency records by forging a witness name on an inmate detention order.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Collett agreed to pay a $750.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Jeremy A. Shoffner20-001
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Shoffner admitted to six counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, during 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016, Shoffner manipulated the timestamp on his timecard thereby falsifying his timesheets regarding his work hours relating to his departure times resulting in him falsely claiming hours he did not work.  Additionally, during October 2018, Shoffner allowed a client of Pine Mountain State Resort Park to bring outside alcohol into the park in violation of the Park’s policy and putting the Park’s ABC license at risk.  This saved the client money because they did not have to buy alcohol from the park.  Finally, during October 2018, Shoffner ordered 2000 logo golf balls for a client of Pine Mountain State Resort Park using the Park’s discount with the golf ball vendor.  This saved the client money because they did not have to pay the retail price for the golf balls.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Shoffner agreed to pay a $6,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Johnathan Faith20-004
Faith admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, while employed as a Sergeant with the Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, Faith falsified agency records by forging an inmate’s signature on an inmate detention order. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Faith agreed to pay a $1,500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Kevin Rust20-009
During the course of his employment as a Transportation Engineer Specialist, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Mr. Rust admitted to two (2) counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, Mr. Rust accepted gifts, in the form of basketball tickets, totaling in value of more than $25 in a calendar year from a contractor or consultant of his agency. 
In Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Rust agreed to pay a $500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Laura Dolan20-002
In a Final Order of Default, the Commission found Ms. Dolan to have violated one (1) count of the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, Ms. Dolan failed to file the Statement of Financial Disclosure required to be filed within thirty days of leaving state government as required by KRS 11A.050. 
Pursuant to the Final Order of Default, Ms. Dolan must pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty and receive a public reprimand.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Matt Bullock20-014
While employed as  Chief District Engineer, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Mr. Bullock admitted to four counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, Mr. Bullock accepted gifts, in the form of basketball tickets, totaling in value of more than $25 in a calendar year from a contractor or consultant of his agency. 
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Bullock agreed to pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Michael Chadwell20-007
Mr. Chadwell admitted to seven (7) counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, as a Landscape Gardner for the Department of Parks, Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet, Mr. Chadwell, before and after work hours, used a state owned vehicle for his own personal use and enjoyment.  The violations occured during March, April, May, June, July, August, and September of 2019.
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Mr. Chadwell agreed to pay a $7,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Michael Tipton20-011
During the course of his employment as a Transportation Engineer Supervisor, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet Mr. Tipton admitted to two (2) counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, Mr. Tipton accepted gifts, in the form of basketball tickets, totaling in value of more than $25 in a calendar year from a contractor or consultant of his agency. 
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Tipton agreed to pay a $500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Patrick Tucker20-010
During the course of his employment as a Transportation Engineer Technologist III Mr. Tucker admitted to one (1) counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, Mr. Tucker accepted gifts, in the form of basketball tickets, totaling in value of more than $25 in a calendar year from a contractor or consultant of his agency. 
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Tucker agreed to pay a $250.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Rebecca Black20-017
In a Final Order of Default, the Commission found Ms. Black to have violated two (2) counts in violation of the Code of Ethics while employed as a Mental Health Social Service Clinician at the Kentucky State Reformatory, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically,  during August and September of 2019, Ms. Black used her position to engage in an inappropriate relationship with an inmate, including using the Department of Corrections’ JPay system to engage in inappropriate communications with the inmate.  Black did so to fulfill her own prurient interest.     
Pursuant to the Final Order of Default, Ms. Black must pay a $6,000.00 civil penalty and receive a public reprimand.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Richard Skaggs18-007
**OPINION and ORDER of the FRANKLIN CIRCUIT COURT reversed the Final Order of the Executive Branch Ethics Commission.**

 In a Final Order issued by the Commission, Mr. Skaggs was found by clear and convincing evidence to have committed one count in violation of the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Captain with the law enforcement division, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources (“KDFWR”), Tourism, Arts, and Heritage Cabinet.  Specifically, Skaggs engaged in a pattern of conduct interfering with a conservation officer’s investigation of a KDFWR District Commission Member in an attempt to influence the agency’s decision to refer the matter to the appropriate prosecutorial entity. 
**OPINION and ORDER of the FRANKLIN CIRCUIT COURT reversed the Final Order of the Executive Branch Ethics Commission.**

Pursuant to the Final Order, Mr. Skaggs was ordered to pay a $1,000 civil penalty and receive a public reprimand.  Mr. Skaggs had a right to appeal the Commission's Final Order in Franklin Circuit Court.   Mr. Skaggs appealed the Final Order to the Franklin Circuit Court, won the appeal, and the Final Order was reversed.  Franklin Circuit Court Division 1, Civil Action No. 19-CI-01276.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Robert Poe20-006
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Poe admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically during the course of his employment as a Transportation Engineering Tech I, Department of Highways, Transportation Cabinet, Mr. Poe used his assigned state vehicle for personal reasons during January of 2019.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Poe agreed to pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Rodney Coffey18-005
Executive Branch Ethics Commission determined that RODNEY COFFEY of Frenchburg, Kentucky, did not violate KRS Chapter 11A, the Executive Branch Code of Ethics. 

On January 16, 2018, the Executive Branch Ethics Commission issued an Initiating Order charging Mr. Coffey with three counts in violation of KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (b), (d).
 After a full administrative hearing, the Commission issued a Final Order determining that Mr. Coffey did not violate the Ethics Code.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Tony Lindauer20-005
Specifically, during his tenure in office as the Property Value Administrator for Jefferson County, Department of Revenue, Finance and Administration Cabinet, Lindauer used his position to satisfy his own prurient interest. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Lindauer agreed to pay a $7,500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Travis Thompson20-013
During the course of his employment as a Transportation Engineering Branch Manager, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Mr. Thompson admitted to four (4) counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, Mr. Thompson accepted gifts, in the form of basketball tickets, totaling in value of more than $25 in a calendar year from a contractor or consultant of his agency. 
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Thompson agreed to pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. William Coy-Geeslin20-008
During his employment as an Internal Policy Analyst III, Kentucky State Police, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, Mr Coy-Geeslin admitted to two (2) counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, during December 2018 and January 2019, Mr. Coy-Geeslin, falsified his timesheets to receive credit for more hours than he actually worked. 
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission , Mr. Coy-Geeslin agreed to pay a $2,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order
Attachments: Attachment
expand Issuing Year : 2019 ‎(22)
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Amanda Flynn19-024
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Ms. Flynn admitted to two counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, during the course of her employment in the Department of Employee Insurance, Personnel Cabinet,  Flynn falsified her timesheets regarding her arrival time resulting in her falsely claiming hours that she did not work, and also used her state computer for her own personal use and enjoyment by spending approximately one (1) hour per day visiting prohibited websites for non-work related reasons.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Ms. Flynn agreed to pay a $2,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. CCMSI19-008
CANNON COCOCHRAN MANAGEMENT SERVICES, INC., (“CCMSI”) a Delaware corporation  agreed to settle 14 counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during its role as a real party in interest, it engaged an individual pursuant to KRS 11A.201(4) by retaining him for compensation to act for or on behalf of CCMSI to influence executive agency decisions or to conduct executive agency lobbying activity.  Specifically, in Counts I through X, CCMSI failed to file an initial registration statement or an updated registration statement for the years 2005-2014, inclusive.  In Counts XI through XIV, CCMSI accepted an engagement for compensation that was contingent on the outcome of an executive agency decision for the years 2005-2008, inclusive.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, CCMSI agrees to pay a $50,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Courtney Kubik19-002
Ms. Kubik admitted to two counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment as a Corrections Officer, Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, Ms. Kubik used her position to access the Department’s inmate JPay system to engage in text messaging with an inmate and gave him a monetary benefit by paying for his use of the system.  Furthermore, on two occasions, Ms. Kubik allowed the inmate to engage with her in intimate, physical contact in the form of kissing and protected the inmate by failing to report the inmate for such conduct.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission,  Ms. Kubik agrees to pay a $3,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Craig Price17-011
Price, a Transportation Engineer II with the Department of Highways, Transportation Cabinet agreed not to contest one count of  violating the Code of Ethics by using his position to give himself an advantage.  Specifically, during January, February, and March 2016, Price used his state position and access to a state-owned vehicle for his own personal use and benefit, and claimed work time to which he was not entitled.
n a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Price agreed to pay a $2,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Henry Mack19-023
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Mack admitted to two count of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, as an employee in the Department of Parks, TAH Cabinet, Mack used his position to schedule himself to tend bar on approximately ten (10) occasions and events at Blue Licks Battlefield State Resort Park and failed to report the tips as income.  Further, Mack scheduled himself to tend bar at these events to the exclusion of other Star Certified employees
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Mack agreed to pay a $3,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. James Gilbreath19-026
While serving as an Internal Policy Analyst III, Division of Air Quality, Mr. Gilreath admitted to three counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, Mr. Gilreath used state time to work on his privately owned, for profit, business, Capital City Trophy; used state equipment to work on his privately owned, for profit, business.  Mr. Gilreath stored approximately 4,400 images on his computer as well as a software program used in his business.  Mr. Gilreath also used his state computer to perform some design work and email the proofs to co-workers for their approval.  In a three (3) month timeframe, Mr. Gilreath sent approximately 168 emails from his state email account regarding his personal business; and, on at least four (4) occasions, sold products through his privately owned business, Capital City Trophy, to the agency by which he is employed.  
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Gilreath agreed to pay a $7,500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. James Kuhn19-019
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Kuhn admitted to four counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, during his employment in the Department of Income Support, Cabinet for Health and Family Services, Kuhn falsified his timesheets regarding his lunch resulting in him falsely claiming hours that he did not work.   
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Kuhn agreed to pay a $4,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. James Sullivan19-007
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Sullivan admitted to 20 counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during his role as an executive agency lobbyist.  Specifically, in Counts I through X, Mr. Sullivan failed to file an initial registration statement or an updated registration statement for the years 2005-2014, inclusive.  In Counts XI through XX, Mr. Sullivan accepted an engagement for compensation that was contingent on the outcome of an executive agency decision for the years 2005-2014, inclusive.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Sullivan agrees to pay a $15,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Jason Whitaker19-022
While serving as a Transportation Engineer Technologist II, Transportation Cabinet, Mr. Whitaker admitted to three counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, Mr. Whitaker directed a state contractor to order unnecessary pipe for a state highway project.  This directive resulted in the unnecessary pipe being delivered to the state and paid for by the state.  Further, Whitaker removed the pipe, which was paid for with state funds, from a state highway project site to his home for his personal use.  Lastly, Whitaker failed to note in his daily report that he directed the contractor to order the pipe to cover up his own actions.  Mr. Whitaker told the contractor that his supervisor wanted the pipe ordered; however, that statement was not true.  Mr. Whitaker’s supervisor never directed him to order this pipe.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Whitaker agreed to pay a $6,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Jeremy Riggs19-012
Jeremy Riggs agreed not to contest two counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, on two separate occasions, Mr. Riggs entered into an agreement, through his personal, for-profit business Back 9 Productions, to provide videography services to the Department of Parks, an agency of the Cabinet where Riggs currently works.  Mr. Riggs entered these agreements after being expressly directed in writing to “not have any contracts between your private business and any agency of the Tourism, Arts, and Heritage Cabinet.” 
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Riggs agreed to pay a $2,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. John Mello18-019
Mr. Mello admitted to two counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, during the course of his employment as a Disability Adjudicator II Department of Income Support Cabinet for Health and Family Services, Mello falsified his timesheets and overtime action sheets regarding his additional work hours resulting in him improperly earning and receiving compensatory leave time.  Additionally, Mello falsified an agency specific database regarding work performed during the additional work hours he claimed. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Mello agreed to pay a $4,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Joseph Fryman19-018
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Fryman admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, Fryman left his position as an officer within the executive branch and failed to file the required Statement of Financial Disclosure within thirty (30) days after the date he no longer served as an officer. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Fryman agreed to pay a $250.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Kurt Godshall19-006
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Godshall agreed to not contest one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred within one year of the termination of his state employment of various positions in the Cabinet for Health and Family Services.  Specifically, Mr. Godshall began employment with and represented private business before a state agency in a matter in which he was directly involved during the last thirty-six (36) months of his tenure.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Godshall agreed to pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Manoj Shanker16-010
On November 14, 2016, the Executive Branch Ethics Commission issued an Initiating Order charging Mr. Shanker with one count in violation of KRS 11A.020(1)(b).  Today
On February 5, 2019 the Commission issued a Final Order of Dismissal resolving the matter.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Matthew Mohalley19-005
Mr. Mohalley admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Corrections Officer, Roederer Correctional Complex, Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, Mr. Mohalley tampered with evidence by claiming to find a Bic cigarette lighter in an inmate’s belongings upon transporting the inmate to the prison from the hospital.  In fact, the lighter belonged to Mohalley and he feared disciplinary action for forgetting to leave it in his vehicle and smoking while driving the prison van.  The inmate received a disciplinary report and was placed in segregation as a result of Mohalley’s actions. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Mohalley agrees to pay a $1,500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission V. Melinda Mayeur19-001
Ms. Mayeur admitted to one count in violation the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment as a Deputy in the Office of the Simpson County Property Valuation Administrator.  Specifically, Ms. Mayeur, during a two-year timeframe, charged a $5.00 fee to notarize documents while on duty at the PVA Office and kept the money for herself.  
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Ms. Mayeur agreed to pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Final Order.  
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Michael C. Harris19-009
During the course of his employment as a Transmission and Studio Coordinator, Kentucky Educational Television, Mr. Harris admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, Harris intentionally kept for his personal use and enjoyment state-issued property including transmitter equipment marked for surplus.
In a  Settlement Agreement agreed to by the Commission, Mr. Harris agreed to pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Nancy Bock19-025
Ms. Bock admitted to five counts of violating the Code of Ethics.   During the course of her employment as the McCracken County Property Value Administratior, Bock submitted fraudulent travel vouchers resulting in reimbursement by the state for her personal out-of-state travel. Bock also used state credit cards to make personal purchases on several occasions. 
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Ms. Bock agreed to pay a $12,500.00 civil penalty that was off-set by the $5,174.49 Bock paid in criminal restitution. Bock will receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Ryan Green16-009
On November 14, 2016, the Executive Branch Ethics Commission issued an Initiating Order charging Mr. Green with one count in violation of KRS 11A.020(1)(b).
 After a full administrative hearing, the Commission issued a Final Order determining that Mr. Green did not violate the Ethics Code.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Stuart Johnson19-028
 Mr. Johnston admitted to one counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically,  as an Executive Director, Office of Technology Services, Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, during September 2015, Johnston directed work to Coastal Cloud under an existing Master Agreement between the Commonwealth and another business without requiring Coastal Cloud to follow the established processes of government for contracts.  Johnston’s conduct allowed Coastal Cloud to receive inappropriate pass-through benefits from the other business.  In return, the other business received payment for allowing their existing contract to be used as a pass-through to benefit Coastal Cloud, while not performing any work under the contract.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Johnston agreed to pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Tanya Risinger19-020
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Ms. Risinger admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, as a an employee with the Kentucky Psychiatric Complex, CHFS,  Risinger used her position as a Correctional Officer to gain access to inmates and engage in an intimate relationship with an inmate she was charged with supervising while on duty. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Ms. Risinger agreed to pay a $2,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Troy Belt19-027
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Belt admitted to four counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Specifically, during March, April, and May 2018, Belt used his state issued cell phone to engage in a personal relationship with a co-worker.  Belt did so to satisfy his own prurient interests.  Further, Belt signed the 2017 year end evaluation of a subordinate employee as the second line supervisor while engaging in a romantic relationship with that subordinate employee.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Belt agreed to pay a $4,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
expand Issuing Year : 2018 ‎(20)
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Angela Rogers18-017
Ms. Rogers admitted to two counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment as an Offender Information Specialist, in the Department of Corrections, Justice & Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, Ms. Rogers used her official government account to access the Kentucky Offender Management System or KOMS database containing protected or otherwise confidential information to conduct multiple searches on her son for personal reasons.   Furthermore, Ms. Rogers used her official government account to access the CourtNet database to conduct multiple searches on her son for personal reasons.  Ms. Rogers could not have conducted these searches without the use and access of her official government credentials.  Ms. Rogers’ conduct resulted in her receiving a benefit and a financial gain from the personal use of government time and resources for her personal use and enjoyment.       
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Ms. Rogers agrees to pay a $3,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Christine Kurilec18-011
Ms. Kurilec admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment as a Classification and Treatment Officer with the Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, Kurilec falsified a government document by altering the date on a Kentucky Department of Corrections Fitness for Duty Assessment and forging her physician’s initials on this alteration.   
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Ms. Kurilec agrees to pay a $1,500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Christopher Hodge18-013
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Hodge admitted to two counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Transportation Engineering Technologist II, with the Department of Highways, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.  Specifically, from December 2017 through January 2018, Hodge used his state-assigned vehicle on four dates to travel outside of his assigned district for personal reasons on state time.  Furthermore, from December 2017 through January 2018, Hodge used his state-assigned vehicle on three dates within his assigned district for personal reasons on state time.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Hodge agrees to pay a $3,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Debbie Talady18-008
Ms. Talady admitted to two counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment as a Quality Control Branch with Department of Community Based Services, Cabinet for Health and Family Services.  Specifically, Talady aided her significant other in receiving inappropriate Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Food Program (SNAP) and Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) benefits by preparing false property owner/landlord documents.  The inappropriate SNAP and CCAP benefits totaled $43,611.00 and were used to pay for childcare for the children Talady shared with her significant other and food purchased for their home.  Furthermore, Talady accessed a government database to track her significant other’s account and provide him status information regarding documents he recently filed with the Department of Community Based Services. 
Pursuant to a Settlement Agreement agreed to by the Commission, Ms. Talady agrees to pay a $2000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  Ms. Talady also faced criminal penalties in addition to the matter before the Commission.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Erik Dunnigan18-006
Dunnigan agreed not to contest one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as an Executive Director at the Cabinet for Economic Development.  Specifically, Dunnigan was directly involved in the Not Practical or Feasibly to Bid contract that was ultimately awarded to Coastal Cloud in November 2015.  Then, after resigning from his position with the Cabinet for Economic Development effective November 15, 2016, Dunnigan, on behalf of Coastal Cloud, communicated with employees of Economic Development, within one (1) year after the termination of his employment, concerning work that was the subject of the original contract, a matter in which he was directly involved during the last thirty-six (36) months of his tenure.   This conduct violated the post-employment provisions of the Executive Branch Code of Ethics.
In a Settlement Agreement agreed to by the Commission, Mr. Dunnigan agreed to pay a $3,000.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Jackie Wright18-014
Mr. Wright admitted to two counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Superintendent I, Scott County Unit, Department of Highways (“Department”), Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.  Specifically, Wright took a deep freeze that was surplus property of the Department for his personal use and enjoyment in violation of the Cabinet’s policies prohibiting such conduct.  Furthermore, Wright took a loaded .22 rifle that he found on the side of the highway while performing his official duties for his personal use and enjoyment without informing his supervisors or otherwise informing law enforcement in violation of the Cabinet’s policies.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Wright paid a $2,000.00 civil penalty, will receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Kathy Hopkins18-001
Hopkins admitted to three counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment as the Division Director of Equine Operations, Kentucky Horse Park, Tourism, Arts & Heritage Cabinet.  Specifically, during 2010, Ms. Hopkins used her position to influence her agency into believing erroneously that a foal that was bred at the Park was lame and “of no further use” to the Park and was suitable “for retirement” so that the horse would become surplus property.  Then, Ms. Hopkins used her influence at her agency to allow her to take the foal home for her personal use and enjoyment so that she could take care of the horse in its “retirement” in exchange for her making a donation of up to $2000 to the Kentucky Horse Park Foundation.  However, Ms. Hopkins never made the donation to the Foundation. Furthermore, from August through September 2010, Ms. Hopkins allowed the horse to continue to be treated for veterinary services that were paid for by the Park in the amount of approximately $230 on her behalf until September 22, 2010. 
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Ms. Hopkins agrees to pay a $2,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, agrees to abstain from ever seeking any future employment with state government, agrees to safely return the horse to the Kentucky Horse Park at her own expense by January 31, 2018, and waives any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Kimberly Kelley (Sowders)18-002
Ms. Kelley (Sowders) admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment as Corrections Officer at the Kentucky State Reformatory, Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, Kelley (Sowders) used her position to access the Department’s inmate pay system to engage in sexually explicit messaging with an inmate.  Kelley (Sowders) also engaged in sexually explicit text messaging with this inmate using a personal cell phone.  Kelley (Sowders) did so to fulfill her own prurient interests, which conflicted with her duties in the public interest.  Kelley (Sowders) used her position and access to inmates to violate the Department’s policies.  By engaging in such conduct, Kelley (Sowders) failed to avoid conduct that would lead the general public to conclude that she was using her official position to further her own private interests.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Ms. Kelley (Sowders) agrees to pay a $500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, agrees to abstain from ever seeking future employment with state government, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Logan Burks18-003
Mr. Burks admitted to six counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Trooper, Kentucky State Police, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, during April of 2016 through April 2017, Burks used a state-issued credit card to obtain fuel for his personal vehicle(s) on twenty-five (25) occasions at a total cost of $834.87.
Pursuant to a Settlement Agreement agreed to by the Commission, Mr. Burks agrees to pay a $6000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Mary Turner18-015
Ms. Turner admitted to three counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment as a Human Services Program Compliance Analyst, Office of Inspector General, Cabinet for Health and Family Services.  Specifically, during 2017 and 2018, Turner falsified her timesheets regarding her work hours relating to her lunch breaks, regular work hours, and additional work hours resulting in her falsely claiming hours she did not work. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Ms. Turner agrees to pay a $3,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Michael Antosh17-009
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Antosh admitted to three counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Corrections Recreations Program Supervisor with the Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, Antosh used his position and access to the Kentucky State Penitentiary’s Sam’s Club account, and access to funds provided by the Kentucky State Penitentiary intended to be used for the purchase of items for agency purposes, to instead purchase items for his personal use and benefit.  Furthermore, Antosh used his position and access to the Kentucky State Penitentiary’s Sam’s Club account to acquire and redeem approximately $610 in “rewards cash” that had accrued on the State Penitentiary’s Sam’s Club account for his personal use and benefit.  He used this “rewards cash” to obtain items at Sam’s Club including grocery items, clothing, and alcoholic beverage purchases for use by himself and his family.  Finally, Antosh used his position as a Corrections Recreations Programs Supervisor to sell items directly to inmates with an approximately 30% markup upon specified agreement with management that profits were to be turned over to the penitentiary’s recreations department accounts.   Antosh intentionally dealt with this profit as his own property and failed to make required payment or disposition to the penitentiary by selling these items without properly turning over the earned profit to the penitentiary.  Antosh sold items to inmates, such as boots and watches, for his own financial benefit and in violation of prison policies and procedures since these items were prohibited.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Antosh agrees to pay a $6,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Michael Martindale16-004
In a Final Order issued by the Commission, Mr. Martindale was found by clear and convincing evidence to have committed one count in violation of the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as an HVAC Inspector with the Department of Housing (Department), Building, and Construction, Public Protection Cabinet.  Specifically, on or about September 11, 2015, Martindale was found to have used his official position to access confidential and personal contact information of HVAC licensee’s regulated by the Department.  Martindale accessed this information by running a report of all licensees in the Department’s internal Jurisdiction Online System. Martindale subsequently passed this information on to his wife who was starting an online HVAC Education Service called TRADETECH.  The confidential contact information was used by TRADETECH to solicit licensees for the business.  As of April 27, 2016, Department records reflected that TRADETECH’S online classes had been used over 800 times by licensees regulated by the Department.
Pursuant to the Final Order, Mr. Martindale is order to pay a $5000.00 civil penalty and receive a public reprimand.  Mr. Martindale has a right to appeal to the Franklin Circuit Court
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Nathaniel Bebe18-023
Mr. Bebe admitted to six counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Disability Adjudicator II, Department of Income Support, Cabinet for Health and Family Services.  Specifically, Mr. Bebe falsified six timesheets regarding his regular and additional work hours resulting in him falsely claiming hours he did not work and improperly earning and receiving compensatory leave time.   
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Bebe agrees to pay a $3,000.00 civil penalty, refrain from ever again seeking employment with the executive branch of the Commonwealth, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The $3,000.00 penalty was completely offset by the amount of restitution Mr. Bebe paid to his former agency.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Patrick Mefford18-016
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Mefford admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Highway Maintenance Technician II, Department of Highways, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.  Specifically, during May 2018, Mr. Mefford used a state-issued credit card to obtain fuel for his personal vehicle for a total cost of $30.77.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Mefford agrees to abstain from seeking employment in service for the Commonwealth of Kentucky for a period of ten (10) years.  If Mr. Mefford seeks employment with the Commonwealth, then he agrees to be responsible for the full civil penalty $5,000.  Mr. Mefford will also receive a public reprimand and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Ron Turner18-012
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Turner admitted to two counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Fiscal Manager with the Department of Juvenile Justice, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, from 2014 through 2018, Turner approved and submitted expense and travel reimbursement vouchers without appropriate and required documentation or supervisor approval using two other employee’s EMARS account for travel, that he did not actually take, in the amount of $4751.02.  Furthermore, during November 2017, Turner took cash deposits of approximately $2000 from moneys secured by the Education Branch meant to be deposited into the Kentucky State Treasury and kept those deposits for his own personal use and enjoyment.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Turner agrees to pay a $4,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Scott Hoffman18-010
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mr. Hoffman admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Correctional Sergeant with the Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, Hoffman accessed a state database to divulge confidential information to one inmate about another inmate with whom the first inmate was involved in a conflict.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Hoffman agrees to pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Sherry Collins18-018
Ms. Collins admitted to three counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment as an Environmental Scientist III, Division of Mine Reclamation and Enforcement, Energy and Environment Cabinet.  Specifically, during December 2016 through February 2017, Collins falsified mine inspections reports to reflect work that she did not perform and falsified timesheets regarding her regular work hours resulting in her falsely claiming hours she did not work. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Ms. Collins agrees to pay a $4,500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Shonda Adonis18-020
Ms. Adonis admitted to three counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment as a Correctional Officer, in the Department of Corrections, Justice & Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, Ms. Adonis used her position as a Correctional Officer, to access the Department’s inmate pay system to engage in text messaging with an inmate.  Furthermore, Ms. Adonis used her official government account to access the Kentucky Offender Management System or KOMS database containing protected or otherwise confidential information to conduct multiple searches regarding this same inmate.   Finally, Ms. Adonis used her position as a Correctional Officer, to allow this same inmate time out of his cell during the time the inmate should have been sleeping.  Ms. Adonis could not have conducted the KOMS searches without the use and access of her official government credentials. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Ms. Adonis agrees to pay a $4,500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Theresia Logan18-009
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Ms. Logan admitted to three counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment as a Consumer Complaint Investigator with Office of the Attorney General.  Specifically, Logan used her official government accounts to access investigative databases containing protected or otherwise confidential information to conduct multiple searches on various family members without any work related reason to do so.  Logan could not have conducted these searches without the use and access of her official government credentials.  Furthermore, Logan used her official position to contact the Mayor of Lexington, Kentucky, and request assistance for her son who hit a pothole.  The email estimated damages to her son’s vehicle of $1,000.  Logan also used her official position to contact the Administrative Section Supervisor at the Department of Professional Licensing regarding her mother.  Logan contacted the Administrative Section Supervisor via telephone, left a voicemail, and identified herself as being “with the Kentucky Attorney General’s Office.”  No work related reason existed to justify Logan to make either of these calls, as the Attorney General’s Office has no jurisdiction over either the City of Lexington or the Department of Professional Licensing in this context, nor did the Attorney General’s Office have an open matter related to these offices or Logan’s family members.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Ms. Logan agrees to pay a $3,500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Troy Koon18-021
Mr. Koon admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Park Manager, Department of Parks, Tourism, Arts, and Heritage Cabinet.  Specifically, Mr. Koon purchased firewood on behalf of the Commonwealth from an individual operating a “cash only” business and who would not supply Koon with a receipt.  Mr. Koon attempted to get reimbursement from the Department of Parks but could not receive reimbursement without a receipt.  Mr. Koon, unable to obtain a receipt from the seller, created false receipts and forged the name of the seller on the invoices.  Mr. Koon then submitted the forged receipts to the Department of Parks. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mr. Koon agrees to pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
expand Issuing Year : 2017 ‎(15)
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Brandon Hendricks17-012
Hendricks admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as Correctional Officer, Department of Corrections (“Department”), Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, during December 2014, Hendricks used his position as a Correctional Officer, and his access to female inmates, to engage in sexual activity with a female inmate under his supervision.  Hendricks did so to fulfill his own prurient interests, which conflicted with his duties in the public interest.  Hendricks used his position and access to the inmate to violate the Department’s policies.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Hendricks agrees to pay a $1,500.00 civil penalty, receives a public reprimand, agrees to abstain from state employment for five years, and waives any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. David Wilson17-014
Wilson admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as an Administrative Specialist III, Office of Special Prosecutions, Office of the Attorney General. Specifically, Mr. Wilson, from approximately April through June 2017, used state time and resources for personal reasons and did not complete his work for the state. Wilson used approximately 19 hours of state time for personal reasons. Wilson also used state resources to engage in personal communications.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Wilson agrees to pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Elizabeth Calton17-015
Calton admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment as a Correctional Officer, with the Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically,  Ms. Calton used her position as a Correctional Officer, to access the Department’s inmate pay system to engage in sexually explicit text messaging with an inmate. Calton did so to fulfill her own prurient interests, which conflicted with her duties in the public interest. Calton used her position and access to inmates to violate the Department’s policies. By engaging in such  conduct, Ms. Calton failed to avoid conduct that would lead the general public to conclude that she was using her official position to further her own private interest.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Calton agrees to pay a $1,500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Gary Kitchen17-005
Kitchen admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Maintenance Superintendent I, District 9, Transportation Cabinet.  Specifically, on numerous occasions during 2015 and 2016, Kitchen used his position and access to state-owned supplies and supply inventories of a state subcontractor as well as his access to a state-issued credit card to convert these items and services for his own personal use and enjoyment or financial gain.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Kitchen agrees to pay a $1,500.00 civil penalty, receives a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Joshua Mattingly17-001
Mattingly admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Corrections Officer, Department of Corrections (DOC), Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, beginning April of 2016, Mattingly used his official position to access a DOC confidential inmate database over 200 times to look up information concerning a former female offender of DOC, and her ex-fiancé, a current male inmate of DOC.  Mattingly had no official work related reason for accessing this information.  Mattingly further had a conflict of interest due to the fact that he had reported the female for transporting Suboxone into the facility to provide to the male inmate resulting in criminal charges against the female.  Mattingly then began a romantic relationship with the female, knowing that she was being investigated for the conduct for which he had reported her, creating a conflict of interest between his personal and private interest and his duties in the public interest.
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission,  Mattingly agreed to pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty, abstain from seeking future employment with the executive branch of state government for a period of five (5) years, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Mattingly is no longer employed by the Commonwealth and has already faced criminal penalties. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Lisa Tucker17-006
Tucker admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment with the Department of Juvenile Justice, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, from approximately 2009 through 2011, Tucker participated in an intimate relationship with a subordinate employee.  During the same time, Tucker served at varying times as the subordinate employee’s first line and second line supervisor, and she conducted evaluations and made management decisions regarding this subordinate employee.  In 2009 and 2010, she signed evaluations as a second-line supervisor to the subordinate employee.  In 2001, she signed his interim evaluations as a first-line supervisor, and then signed his year-end evaluation and special detail temporary work assignment paperwork as his second-line supervisor.    

Despite Tucker’s ongoing intimate relationship with this employee, Tucker failed to inform anyone in her chain of command of this conflict and she failed to abstain from participation in this employee’s evaluations and supervision.  
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Tucker agreed to pay a $2,500.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Mark Arnold17-003
Arnold admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as an Administrative Branch Manager, with the Administrative Services Branch of the Department of Housing, Buildings, and Construction, Public Protection Cabinet.  Specifically, beginning on or around late 2015 through August 2016, Arnold used his official position and access to state resources and facilities to further his personal and financial interests by shipping personal items and for-profit items he sold via Ebay using the state office mail system.  In doing so, Arnold was securing free postage, free UPS service, and free packaging materials for his personal and for profit use at a cost to the state and in derogation of the state interest.  Mr. Arnold also misused his state issued computer and office space to store, catalog, research and otherwise further his Ebay business enterprise. 
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Arnold agreed to pay a $2,000.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Michael Schiesser15-010
Schiesser admitted to three counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Correctional Officer, Department of Corrections (“Department”), Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, on or about September 19, 2014, Schiesser used his access to inmates, to bring at least one inmate contraband in the form of a cell phone, tobacco, SD cards, and gum in exchange for monetary payment.  On or about September 19, 2014, Schiesser brought at least one inmate narcotics in exchange for monetary payment.  Furthermore, during September of 2014, Schiesser used his knowledge of the facility along with his access to inmates, to participate in a scheme along with a certain inmate to distribute contraband within the facility in exchange for payment.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Schiesser agrees to pay a $3,000.00 civil penalty, receives a public reprimand, agrees to refrain from seeking state employment for 10 years and waives any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Rhonda Bingham17-008
Bingham admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment as a Public Assistance Program Specialist, Department for Community Based Services, Cabinet for Health and Family Services (“Cabinet”).  Specifically, from approximately February 2016 through May 2016, Bingham used state time and resources to engage in her for-profit business.  Bingham used her state office, state electronic mail account, and state time to engage in a for-profit enterprise as a Pure Romance intimacy products consultant.  Bingham used her state-issued electronic mail while on state time to arrange team building events for her Pure Romance team, schedule “thank you” and VIP events for her team and costumers, and arrange tables at crafts shows and bridal events, which resulted in her expanding her business and profits for her business.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission Bingham agreed to pay a $1,250.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Scott Nevitt17-002
Nevitt admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Highway Safety Patrol Operator, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.  Specifically, beginning on or around October 1, 2015, Nevitt used his official position, state issued vehicle, and state issued cell phone to engage in inappropriate communication and contact with a minor child.  Nevitt visited the school of the minor child or the vicinity of the school on multiple occasions using his state vehicle and misused his state-issued cellphone to engage in texting with the minor child for no work related reason and in derogation of the state interest. 

 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Nevitt agreed to pay a $1,250.00 civil penalty, to never seek future employment in the executive branch of state government, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Stacy Skinner17-007
Skinner admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Highway Superintendent II, Department of Highways, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (“Cabinet”).  Specifically, on or about October 27, 2016, during the evening hours, Skinner used a state-owned vehicle to take and haul approximately fifteen (15) pieces of guardrail, valued at approximately $451.95, owned by the Cabinet that was located at a state facility in Scott County, Kentucky, to his own property in Bourbon County and then moved it to a property owned by his friend in Harrison County.  Skinner intended to use the guardrail for the personal use of his friend.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission Skinner agreed to pay a $1,500.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Skinner is no longer employed by the Commonwealth. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Vincent Gross16-007
Gross admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Social Service Clinician, Department of Juvenile Justice, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, between May 2015 and February 2016, on multiple occasions, Gross used or attempted to use his official position to obtain and provide information from a secured database and case records, about a client of DJJ who was not under his assigned supervision, to the client’s incarcerated mother, with whom he was engaged in a personal relationship.  Furthermore, Gross used his official position in derogation of and in conflict with the public interest by abusing state resources and access to information systems to engage in a personal relationship with the incarcerated mother.  Gross did so to fulfill his own prurient interests, which conflicted with his duties in the public interest.    
Pursuant to a Settlement Agreement, Gross agrees to pay a $1,500.00 civil penalty, receives a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Gross is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Walter Gaffield17-004
Gaffield admitted to three counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as Executive Director of the Office of Administrative Services, Personnel Cabinet (“Cabinet”).  Specifically, Gaffield used his position to solicit campaign contributions from Cabinet employees at various times between 2010 and 2016.  Gaffield solicited financial contributions for a Jefferson County judicial campaign and two gubernatorial campaigns from other non-merit Cabinet employees. These requests for contributions were made in the workplace, made reference to the employee’s supervisor or Appointing Authority, made during working hours, and a portion of the contributions were collected in the workplace.  
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Gaffield agreed to pay a $6,000.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Gaffield is no longer employed by the Commonwealth. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission vs. Jennifer Mitchell17-010
Mitchell admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment as a Correctional Officer, with the Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, Ms. Mitchell used her position as a Correctional Officer, and her access to male inmates, to engage in sexual contact with an inmate under her supervision.  Mitchell did so to fulfill her own prurient interests, which conflicted with her duties in the public interest.  Mitchell used her position and access to the inmate to violate the Department’s policies.   By engaging in such conduct, Ms. Mitchell failed to avoid conduct that would lead the general public to conclude that she was using her official position to further her private interest.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mitchell agrees to pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, abstain from ever seeking any future employment with the executive branch of state government, and waives any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission vs. William "Bill" Ryan17-013
Ryan admitted to two counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Special Assistant of the Office of Secretary, Personnel Cabinet.  Specifically, during the course of his employment as a Staff Assistant, Ryan used his position with the Cabinet to solicit campaign contributions from Cabinet employees.   Ryan admitted to soliciting financial contributions for a gubernatorial campaign from two other non-merit Personnel Cabinet employee between 2010 and 2011. 

Ryan solicited contributions from Employee A by phone seeking a donation to the campaign for the re-election of then Governor Steve Beshear.   Ryan instructed Employee A that she was required to donate $250 to the campaign based on her salary; thus, determining that the donation was related to her state employment and was required of her. 

Ryan contacted Employee B on two separate occasions seeking donations for the Primary and General elections for the Beshear re-election campaign.  The first time Ryan contacted Employee B, he called on her personal cell phone before the Primary.  Ryan stated that he was contacting her to solicit her “required” donation.  She responded that she had already donated.  Prior to the General election, Ryan contacted her by phone again, indicating that she was “required to donate $250.”  He then approached Employee B in person at the Cabinet.  Ryan instructed her to accompany him to the cafeteria at the Transportation Cabinet before taking the donation from her.

Furthermore, for some pay periods in 2014 and 2015, Ryan admitted to submitting timesheets claiming to have worked at the Cabinet during times that he did not appear at any of the Cabinet’s offices.  In doing so, Ryan collected pay for time he falsely reported on his timesheets and, further, failed to create little to any discernible work product while receiving compensation.  Other Cabinet employees witnessed Ryan only appearing at the Cabinet on the days required for him to submit his timesheets. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Ryan agreed to pay a $4,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal. The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
expand Issuing Year : 2016 ‎(10)
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Billie Buckley16-002
Buckley admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred while she served in a supervisory position with the Department of Worker’s Claims, Kentucky Labor Cabinet.  Specifically, Ms. Buckley had a close, personal relationship with a subordinate employee over which she had supervisory authority.   Further, upon the subordinate employee’s request, she supplied interview questions to an interviewee, who was a close, personal friend of the subordinate employee, prior to the interview for a position with the Department giving the interviewee an advantage over the other applicants for the position.   Ms. Buckley then failed to recuse herself from the interview panel and participated in the selection of subordinate employee’s friend for the position with the Department.  By engaging in such conduct, Ms. Buckley failed to avoid conduct that would lead the general public to conclude that she was using her official position to further her private interest.
In a settlement agreement approved by the Commission, Buckley agreed to pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Dana Terhune15-012
Terhune admitted to two counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred while she served as a Correctional Treatment Officer with the Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  Specifically, Ms. Terhune on or about September 13, 2013, used her position as an employee of the Luther Luckett Correctional Complex to gain access to an inmate in order to engage in intimate, physical contact with that inmate.  Further, from September 2013 through March 2014, Terhune used her position to access a Department of Corrections database to view information concerning the inmate over nine hundred times.  Terhune did so to fulfill her own prurient interest, which conflicted with her duties in the public interest. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Terhune agreed to pay a $4,000.00 civil penalty, to be offset by her criminal fines of $2,500, receive a public reprimand, agrees to abstain from seeking employment with state government for five years, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Terhune is no longer employed by the Commonwealth and has already pleaded guilty to criminal charges relating to the conduct. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Galena Joy Bailey16-006
Bailey admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of her employment as a Juvenile Services Clinician for the Department of Juvenile Justice, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet. Specifically, on or about November 4, 2015, Bailey used her position to help a personal friend, by misrepresenting her authority and threatening the boyfriend of her friend’s daughter with retribution in the court system if he did not return the daughter’s dog to her family.  Furthermore,
Bailey used her position to access the CourtsNet system to do a criminal background check and obtain knowledge of court proceedings related to a man.  Bailey had no work-related reason to access this information.  This information was then used by Bailey to threaten the man with retribution in the court system if he did not return the daughter’s dog to her family.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Bailey agreed to pay a $1,500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Bailey is no longer employed by the Commonwealth
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. George Smithers15-015
Smithers admitted to three counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Facility Services Supervisor/Action Director of Residential Services, Hazelwood Center, Cabinet for Health and Family Services. Specifically, between December 2014 through March of 2015, Smithers used the facilities at Hazelwood Center for his own private photography business.  Smithers held photography sessions in a vacant room of one of the buildings in the Hazelwood Center complex, setting up a photography studio with his private photography equipment and props.  Smithers then posted the photographs, some of which show features of the Hazelwood building in which he took the photographs, on his business’s internet site.  

Moreover, between December 2014 through March of 2015, Smithers used his position and access to employees at Hazelwood Center to further his own private photography business.  Smithers used his influence over employees he supervised to solicit employees to participate in private photography sessions to create modeling portfolios for the employees.  Smithers would advertise his personal photography business to employees participating in the new employee orientation and other training classes that he was supervising and conducting.  

Finally, Smithers used the Cabinet resources, including his computer equipment, for his own private businesses by using computers and equipment to complete invoices and send emails during state time relating to his photography business, his home restoration and remodeling business, his wedding photography and entertainment business, his mobile training business, and his tax service.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Smithers agreed to pay a $3,500.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, agreed to abstain from seeking employment with the Executive Branch of state government for a period of five years, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Smithers is no longer employed by the Commonwealt
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Gerri Mesmer16-001
That during the course of her employment as a Social Service Clinician I, Westport Group Home, Department of Juvenile Justice, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, Mesmer used her position and her access to juvenile male offenders to engage in inappropriate interactions with at least one juvenile under her supervision.  Mesmer did so to fulfill her own prurient interests, which conflicted with her duties in the public interest.  Mesmer also used her position and access to juvenile offenders to violate the Department’s policies.  

Furthermore, Mesmer, provided a male juvenile offender under her supervision with items of value, including Xbox game console, Xbox video games, food items, and cash money at the same time that she was attempting to or engaging in inappropriate interactions with the male juvenile offender. Mesmer provided these items of value to the juvenile in violation of the Department’s policies and used her position and access to the juvenile to do so.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mesmer admitted to two counts of violating the Code of Ethics.  Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mesmer agrees to pay a $3,500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, waives any right to appeal, and agrees to not seek employment with the Executive Branch of the Commonwealth of Kentucky for five (5) years.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Mesmer is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. James Johnson15-009
Johnson admitted to two counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Correctional Officer with the Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet. Between 2008 and 2011, on multiple occasions, Johnson used his position and his access to female inmates to sexually abuse at least two female inmates under his supervision.  Johnson did so to fulfill his own prurient interests, which conflicted with his duties in the public interest.  Johnson used his position and access to the inmates to violate the Department’s policies.   Furthermore, between 2008 and 2011, Johnson provided female inmates items of value, including candy bars and other food items, at the same time that he was also involved in conduct in which he engaged in sexual acts on the female inmates.   
Pursuant to a Settlement Agreement, Johnson agreed to pay a $2,500.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, agreed to abstain from seeking employment with the Executive Branch of state government for a period of ten years, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Johnson is no longer employed by the Commonwealth and has already pleaded guilty to criminal charges relating to the conduct.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Kelly Shortridge14-025
That as an Environmental Inspector III for the Department of Natural Resources, Public Protection Cabinet, Shortridge admitted to four counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment. Specifically, between 2009 through 2012, Shortridge failed to perform his duties as a mine inspector for mining operations owned by an individual who was providing Shortridge with bribes totaling approximately $46,000 to induce Shortridge not to issue citations against the mining operations for failure to abide by the surface mine reclamation laws and regulations governing the mining operations assigned to Shortridge for inspection.  Furthermore, at some time during 2012, after Shortridge was no longer inspecting the mine of the surface mine owner who had been paying Shortridge for failing to properly regulate his mine, Shortridge sent a message to the mine owner stating that if the mine owner did not pay Shortridge an additional amount of money that Shortridge would use his professional influence in his agency to cause reclamation violations or regulatory actions to be issued against the mine owner’s business that could have resulted in financial penalties in excess of $25,000.  Finally, on or about August 21, 2013, Shortridge presented false statements to the Commission’s investigator subverting the Commission’s investigation of the allegations.  
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Shortridge agrees to pay a $4,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, agrees to abstain from ever again seeking employment with state government, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Shortridge is no longer employed by the Commonwealth and has already pleaded guilty to criminal charges relating to the conduct.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Lewis Young15-013
Young admitted to three counts of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Transportation Engineering Technologist III, District Five, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. Specifically, Young engaged in soliciting money ranging in amounts from $20 to $150 from employees working for a subcontractor of the Cabinet over which he was supervising as an inspector.   Young would eventually pay back the employees after he had used and enjoyed the funds.  Young used his position and influence with the Cabinet to influence the employees of the subcontractor to give him the funds with full knowledge that Young could influence the Cabinet to shut down the project, force the subcontractor to redo work on a project, or extend the project. 

Furthermore, Young slept while on the job.  Oftentimes, Young would wake up from his naps and force the subcontractor to redo work on a project over which Young was serving as the inspector for the Cabinet.  Young would report a full day of work on his timesheet when he was using work time to fulfill his personal interests of sleeping. Young’s false reporting of his sleeping time as regular work hours on his timesheets resulted in Young receiving compensation for time that he did not fulfill his job duties or work for the Cabinet.   Young forced a subcontractor to redo work that he failed to witness being performed because he was sleeping.  Young influenced the Cabinet to compensate him for time that he did not work resulting in his receipt of financial gain and benefits in derogation of the state and the public interest.  By Young falsely reporting his work time on his timesheets, Young failed to avoid conduct that would lead the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his private interest. 

Finally, from approximately January through December 2014, Young performed outside employment with a business that does business with the Cabinet without informing his supervisor or appointing authority and without receiving permission from the Cabinet to do so.   While working for this business, Young received compensation from the business resulting from a contract with the Cabinet.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Young agreed to pay a $3,000.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Young is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Patrick Hoover16-003
Hoover admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Probation and Parole Officer with the Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet. Specifically, between 2012 and 2014, on multiple occasions, Hoover used his position and access to a female offender who was under his supervision, to engage in an inappropriate relationship with the female offender including exchanging in sending sexually explicit text messages and photos.    
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Hoover agrees to pay a $1,500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, agrees to abstain from seeking employment with the Executive Branch of state government for a period of five years, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Hoover is no longer employed by the Commonwealth. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Timothy Longmeyer16-008
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Longmeyer resolved 45 counts of violations of the Code of Ethics during the course of his employment as Secretary of the Personnel Cabinet.  Specifically, Longmeyer admitted to 41 counts of using his position to secure cash and other benefits through a kickback scheme. Longmeyer influenced vendors of the state to employ the services of a private consultant who in turn agreed to funnel certain payments to Longmeyer from the compensation received for his services. In most instances, the consultant provided cash directly to Longmeyer. In other instances, Longmeyer directed the consultant to use the cash to fund illegal conduit contributions to certain political campaigns.

Furthermore, Longmeyer admitted to two counts of failing to file a complete Statement of Financial Disclosure with the Ethics Commission for the 2014 and 2015 calendar years and failed to disclose the name and address of any source of gross income exceeding $1000 from any one source, failed to disclose the source of retainers received by him relating to matters of the Cabinet, failed to disclose any representation or intervention for compensation by him for any person or business before the Cabinet, and failed to disclose sources of gifts of money or property with a retail value exceeding $200 from sources other than his family.

Finally, Longmeyer agreed not to contest two counts related to conduct between 2011 and 2015, in which Longmeyer, while on state time, directed subordinate employees to solicit financial contributions for gubernatorial and judicial campaigns from Personnel Cabinet employees under his supervision. These requests for contributions were made in the workplace, during working hours, and a portion of the contributions were collected in the workplace.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Longmeyer agrees to pay a $208,500.00 civil penalty, which will be off-set by the criminal restitution he is paying to the U.S. District Court, agrees to abstain from seeking employment with the Executive Branch of state government for a period of ten years, receives a public reprimand, and waives any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Longmeyer is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
expand Issuing Year : 2015 ‎(19)
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Chad Hayes15-008
That during the course of his employment as a Correctional Officer, Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, between September and October of 2013, Hayes used his position to take scrap metal owned by the Department that he hauled to various scrap yards and sold this property for his own personal financial benefit or gain.  Hayes had the proceeds of the sale of the scrap metal split into checks and cash.  The checks he would return to the Department.  The cash he would keep for himself.  Hayes collected approximately $700 in cash that he kept for himself from the sale of the Department’s scrap metal.  Hayes used some of the monies he collected to buy gas for his personal vehicle, food, and other personal property.  Hayes also purchased food and other items for the inmates in violation of the Department’s policies.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Hayes will pay a $1,500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and has waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Hayes is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Courtney Smith15-006
That during the course of her employment as a Social Service Worker II, Department for Aging and Independent Living, Cabinet for Health and Family Resources, on approximately two occasions, Smith falsely reported that she conducted visits with clients of the Department when she had not actually performed those visits.  On over forty occasions, Smith submitted falsified timesheets documenting regular working hours for time she did not actually work resulting in her receiving compensation and work time credit for approximately twenty-five hours that she did not work.  
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Smith paid a $1,500.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Smith is no longer employed by the Commonwealth. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Deborah Vahle15-004
Vahle, while not admitting that she committed violations of the Executive Branch Code of Ethics, recognized that the evidence against her indicates that during the course of her employment as the Public Assistance Program Specialist, Division of Program Performance, Department for Community-Based Services, Cabinet for Health and Family Services, from 2011 through 2012, Vahle was assigned the responsibility of conducting reviews or audits of the Division’s files of the ongoing eligibility of Medicaid recipients.  Part of the review process required Vahle to contact and interview a Medicaid recipient or his or her authorized representative to determine ongoing eligibility for her agency to determine whether the recipient should continue to receive Medicaid benefits.  On approximately eleven (11) occasions, Vahle falsified information that she reported on Division documentation and in the records of Medicaid recipients.  Concerning some of the recipients, Vahle falsely reported that she had conducted interviews or conversations with the personal representatives of the recipients that she had not performed.  Concerning other recipients, Vahle falsely reported that the recipients or personal representatives had refused to participate when she had not actually contacted the individuals indicated.  Finally, concerning other recipients, Vahle reported to have spoken with individuals who were no longer serving in the capacity as the personal representatives of the recipients or were no longer working at the facilities listed for the recipients.  Vahle agreed that she would not contest the charges for the purposes of settling this matter.
Pursuant to a Settlement Agreement, Vahle will pay a $2,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and has waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. Vahle is no longer employed by the Commonwealth. 

Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. James Bland15-014
Bland admitted to three counts of violations to the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Transportation Engineering Technologist III, District 5, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. Between November 2013 and February 2014, Bland presented to his supervisor with the Cabinet at least fifteen (15) false and altered Certificate of Service forms indicating that he had participated in jury duty when he did not actually participate in jury duty.   Bland also presented at least fifteen (15) fraudulent attendance reports and timesheets indicating that he participated in jury duty when he actually spent such time on his personal interests.   Bland’s false reporting of his jury duty as valid hours on his timesheets resulted in Bland receiving compensation for time that he did not actually attend jury duty or perform any service for the Commonwealth.   Bland used his position to influence the Cabinet to compensate him for time that he did not work or attend jury duty resulting in his receipt of financial gain and benefits in derogation of the state and the public interest.  By Bland presenting fraudulent Certificates of Service and timesheets, Bland failed to avoid conduct that would lead the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his private interest.

Between June through August 2014, on at least nine (9) occasions, ranging from thirty (30) minutes to two (2) hours, Bland used the state vehicle for his own personal interests during state time at locations in Louisville and Jefferson County, which was not part of his assigned work area during that time frame and in which he had no valid purpose of remaining for those lengths of time.  Bland used his position to influence the Cabinet to allow him to use the state vehicle for her personal interests and to compensate him for time that he did not work resulting in his receipt of financial gain and benefits in derogation of the state and the public interest.  By Bland presenting fraudulent timesheets, Bland failed to avoid conduct that would lead the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his private interest.

Finally, during 2014, Bland performed outside employment with a business that does business with the Cabinet without informing his supervisor or appointing authority and without receiving permission from the Cabinet to do so.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Bland paid a $4,000.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and has waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Bland is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Jason Abney14-017
That during the course of his employment as a Transportation Auto/Truck Technician III, assigned to the Jefferson East Maintenance Facility, District Five, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Abney used a Cabinet ProCard to purchase tools and auto parts on numerous occasions from a Middletown, Kentucky, auto parts store, at times asking the store’s employee to alter the invoices and submitting the altered invoices to KYTC for payment, while being unable to satisfactorily account for the tools or the parts, some of which could not possibly have been placed on KYTC equipment as they were not for any equipment on District Five’s inventory.  Some of the tools were found in his personal possession and some of the parts he purchased would only fit his personal vehicle.  

He also used his position to purchase items from the auto parts store for his own personal use using the Cabinet’s discounted pricing, which is not available to the ordinary citizen.  Furthermore, the invoices show that Abney did not pay sales tax on these purchases.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Abney paid a $3,000.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Abney is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Jason Driskell15-003
Driskell admitted that during the course of his employment as a Disability Adjudicator III, Department of Disability Services, Cabinet for Health and Family Services, between January 2013 and March 2014, Driskell was assigned to perform job duties in either the Department’s Frankfort or Louisville offices.    On at least 116 work days, Driskell failed to arrive at either office at the time he indicated on the sign-in rosters, arriving at his work station anywhere from sixteen (16) minutes to four (4) hours late, for a total of 211 hours of time he claimed to be working that he was not at work.  Driskell’s false reporting of his actual work hours on his timesheets resulted in Driskell receiving compensation in the approximate amount of $4,385.00.   Driskell used his position to influence his Cabinet to compensate him for time that he did not work resulting in his receipt of financial gain and benefits in derogation of the state and the public interest.  By Driskell falsely reporting his work time on his timesheets, Driskell failed to avoid conduct that would lead the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his private interest.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Driskell will pay the Commission a civil penalty of $3,000.00, offset on a dollar-for-dollar basis by the $6,000 in restitution he submits to the Cabinet, unless he misses more than two (2) installments of his $200 payments to the Cabinet, then he will owe the Commission the full amount of the civil penalty, plus twelve percent (12%) per anum, along with court costs, attorney’s fees, and administrative costs associated with collecting the judgment in circuit court until paid in full.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. John Rittenhouse14-018
Rittenhouse admitted that after he left his employment as Park Manager at Kenlake State Resort Park, Department of Parks, Tourism, Arts, and Heritage Cabinet, the evidence shows he violated the Code of Ethics by immediately taking the position of manager at the restaurant, Jolly’s Dairy Bar and Grill, located at the Lake Barkley Marina.  Further, Rittenhouse entered into a contract to purchase Jolly’s Dairy Bar and Grill by the end of a three (3) year term and had paid the owner of the restaurant $15,000 towards the purchase of the restaurant. 

On or about August 1, 2005, Jolly’s Dairy Bar and Grill entered into a fifteen year lease agreement with BMAR & Associates (“BMAR”; successor ABM Government Services).  BMAR subleased the marina facility, at which Jolly’s Dairy Bar and Grill is located, from the Department of Parks on or about June 20, 2005.  As such, Rittenhouse, by serving as manager and part owner of Jolly’s Dairy Bar and Grill, benefitted and enjoyed, in whole or in part, a contract, agreement, and lease entered into, awarded, or granted by the Department for which he had been employed, within six months of his termination of employment with the Department, in violation of the Code of Ethics.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Rittenhouse paid a $1,500.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Joseph Benjamin Phillips15-017
Phillips admitted to violating the Code of Ethics during the course of his employment as a Staff Attorney III, Office of Legal Services, Highway District Legal Branch, District 3, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, between August 2014 and October 2014, when he abused state time by not appearing at work or otherwise performing work for the state when he claimed regular working hours on his timesheets.  On approximately 54 work days, Phillips failed to arrive at the time he was scheduled to arrive at work according to his work schedule, arriving at his work station anywhere from nineteen (19) minutes to five (5) hours late.  In a nine-day period, Phillips claimed on his timesheets a total of twenty-one (21) hours of time that he was not at work or performing work related activities on behalf of the Cabinet.  Phillips’ false reporting of his actual work hours on his timesheets resulted in Phillips receiving compensation for time he did not actually work.   Phillips used his position to influence his Cabinet to compensate him for time that he did not work resulting in his receipt of financial gain and benefits in derogation of the state and the public interest.  By Phillips falsely reporting his work time on his timesheets, Phillips failed to avoid conduct that would lead the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his private interest.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Phillips paid a $2,500.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and has waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Phillips is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Kevin Booker14-016
That during the course of his employment as a Workers’ Compensation Coverage and Compliance Investigator II, in the Division of Security and Compliance, Department of Workers Claims, Labor Cabinet, Booker worked another job for a private employer in Louisville, Kentucky, while on state time. 

During a 16 month period, Booker worked approximately 70 hours for this private employer during hours that he presented that he was performing duties on behalf of the Labor Cabinet in locations throughout the state.  Thus, in order to perform this outside employment for the private employer, Booker failed to fulfill his assigned job duties for the Labor Cabinet.  Booker also falsified his timesheets he submitted to his Cabinet to show that he was performing work for the Cabinet when he was actually performing work for the private employer, resulting in Booker collecting pay for time he falsely reported on his timesheets. 

Booker also failed to request approval to work for this private employer.  While the Labor Cabinet’s management reminded Booker of his obligation to seek approval from his appointing authority for outside employment, not only did Booker continue to fail to seek approval for the work for this private employer, he actually requested approval to perform work for a different outside private employer.   
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Booker agreed to pay a $3,000.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Booker is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Larry Graves14-015
That during the course of his employment as a Case Management Specialist I for the Department for Community Based Services (“DCBS”) in the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (“CHFS”), Graves accepted, either directly or on behalf of the Church of the First-Born Saints, a church of which he is the pastor, treasurer, sole officer, sole board member, and self-purported owner, over $4,109.40 in donations, the use of a van, and a new roof valued at between $2,500 and $3,000, from the owner of a business that did business with CHFS through the DCBS’s Work Experience Training Program (“WEP”).  Graves also used his position to cause WEP participants to perform work at the Church of the First-Born Saints.  This work, primarily painting and cleaning, was performed free of charge for Graves and his church.  Graves also had a client of his agency sign a “WEP Training Site Agreement” concerning his church and another DCBS client, a WEP participant, on behalf of the church as the “training site representative,” when in fact the client was not a representative of the church but rather merely a friend of Graves.  Graves himself was identified on the “WEP Training Site Agreement” as the WEP participant’s immediate supervisor. 

Graves also accepted and processed an application for a client of DCBS when the client applied for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (“SNAP”) benefits even though Graves did not handle SNAP benefits.  The client was a personal friend of Graves.  Further, in April 2012 it was discovered that this client was in fact not entitled to receive these benefits due to income he was already receiving from the Social Security Administration, which Graves failed to consider when processing his friend’s case. 
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Graves paid a $3,000.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Graves is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission V. Marla Hadley14-023
That during the course of her employment as a Social Service Clinician II, Department for Aging and Independent Living, Salt River Guardianship Section, Cabinet for Health and Family Resources, Hadley used her position to gain access to funds belonging to four individuals who were adults under her supervision as part of her duties for the Department.  Hadley misappropriated those funds for her own personal use and enjoyment and the use and enjoyment of others without the knowledge or approval of her Department, the victims, or their families.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Hadley paid the equivalent of a $5,000.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Hadley is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Michael Mullins15-001
That during the course of his employment as a Youth Services Program Supervisor and Juvenile Facilities Superintendent I, Boyd County Juvenile Detention Center, Department of Juvenile Justice, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, Mullins participated in a clandestine, sexual relationship with a female co-worker who eventually became Mullins’ subordinate employee.  Despite Mullins ongoing sexual relationship with this employee, Mullins failed to abstain from participation in this employee’s evaluations and disciplinary proceedings, and used or attempted to use his position as supervisor to influence his agency’s evaluations of this employee.  After the employee ended the relationship, Mullins continued to influence his agency’s evaluations of this employee, giving her increasingly lower scores on her evaluations.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Mullins paid a $1,500.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Shanion Thurman15-002
In a Final Order of Default approved by the Commission, Thurman was found to have violated the Code of Ethics during her employment as an Administrative Assistant, Department of Public Advocacy, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  In the spring of 2010, Thurman took a copy of a confidential agreement between state and federal prosecutors and a confidential informant outside of her agency.  The confidential agreement detailed a deal between the prosecutors and the confidential informant for a reduced prison sentence in return for his testimony in three criminal matters involving one defendant.   The copy of the confidential agreement was stored at the Department in the filing cabinet of the office of the Assistant Public Advocate for whom Thurman worked as an Administrative Assistant.   Thurman then shared the confidential agreement with her boyfriend at the time.  Thurman knew that her boyfriend was friendly with the defendant.  Thurman’s boyfriend then shared details of the confidential agreement with the defendant in order for the defendant to share the information with the defendant’s lawyer.  The confidential informant was eventually murdered.  A copy of the confidential agreement was found by law enforcement in Thurman’s personal vehicle.
The Final Order of Default followed the issuance of a Recommended Order of Default by an impartial Hearing Officer assigned to the case subsequent to Thurman’s failure to participate in the administrative proceedings process.  In the Final Order, the Commission adopted the Hearing Officer’s Recommended Order finding Thurman to be in default, publicly reprimanded Thurman for her conduct, and ordered her to pay a civil penalty in the amount of $5,000.00.  Thurman has the right to appeal the Final Order in circuit court.  Thurman is no longer employed by the Commonwealth. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Stephanie Sandmann13-07
While serving as a Staff Assistant, Office of the Commissioner, Department of Agriculture, Sandmann was found to have violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by falsifying her timesheets by claiming to have worked at the Department during times that she did not appear at any of the Department’s offices.  In doing so, Sandmann collected pay for time she falsely reported on her timesheets and, further, failed to fulfill her assigned job duties and created little to no discernible work product while receiving compensation. 
The Final Order followed a full evidentiary hearing and the issuance of a Recommended Order by an impartial hearing officer assigned to the case.  In the Final Order, the Commission adopted the hearing officer’s Recommended Order, publicly reprimanded Sandmann for her conduct in violation of KRS 11A.020(1)(b), (c), and (d); and ordered her to pay a civil penalty of $5,000.00, the maximum amount allowed by statute.  Sandmann appealed the Final Order in Franklin Circuit Court. The Franklin Circuit Court upheld that decision stating that the Commission “relied upon clear and convincing evidence” and it properly applied the law in determining that Ms. Sandmann violated the Ethics Code. Ms. Sandmann decided not to appeal the decision of the Circuit Court and has paid her full civil penalty of $5,000.00, the maximum amount allowed by statute.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. William Harris15-005
Harris admitted that during the course of his employment as a Youth Worker III, Louisville Day Treatment Center, Department of Juvenile Justice, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, between March 2014 and July 2014, Harris used state time for his own personal use.  Harris had requested and was given approval by the Department to work part-time for a private, outside employer.  However, Harris worked full-time for this outside employer, as well as working overtime for this employer.  On multiple occasions, Harris, while claiming to be working for the Department, was actually working for his outside employer.   Harris would leave work from the Department early or would arrive to the Department late and claimed time that he was traveling to and from his outside employer as state time on his timesheets.  Harris claimed sick leave on his timesheets for time that we was actually working at his outside employer.  Finally, Harris claimed voting leave for time that he did not use to vote.

Harris, by falsely completing his timesheets as stated above, used any means to influence his agency in derogation of the state at large.  Harris used his official position in using state time, sick leave, and voting leave inappropriately giving him a financial gain of wages and benefits to which he was not entitled.  Finally, by presenting falsified timesheets to his agency for time he did not work, did not vote, and was not sick, Harris was failing to avoid all conduct which might in any way lead members of the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his private interest.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Harris will pay a $1,000.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and has waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Harris continues to be employed by the Commonwealth. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission vs. Chad Buckley15-007
Buckley admitted that during the course of his employment as a Social Worker with the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, on or about July 29, 2014, Buckley, who was responsible for ensuring the welfare of the children assigned to him as a Social Worker by the Cabinet, used his position to promise a parent who was under review by the Cabinet a home visit with a child assigned to Buckley in exchange for the parent selling Buckley prescription pills at a discounted rate.    
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Buckley agreed to pay a $1,250.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Buckley is no longer employed by the Commonwealth. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission vs. J. Casey Hackworth15-011
That during the course of his employment as a Racing License Administrator, Licensing Branch, Horse Racing Commission, Public Protection Cabinet, between July and October 2014, he used his position to take, for his own personal use and enjoyment, cash that he collected through his regular duties and to manipulate the records of his agency to conceal the amount of cash he kept for himself. Hackworth accumulated approximately $5,715.00 in cash directly from licensing fees he collected during his employment.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Hackworth will pay a $1,500.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and has waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Hackworth has already paid the full amount in restitution to the Public Protection Cabinet through a previous agreement. Hackworth is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission vs. John Sumner15-016
That during the course of his employment as the Administrator for the Western State Nursing Facility, Cabinet for Health and Family Services, between 2011 and 2014, Sumner used his position to influence his agency to hire an individual as a contract employee to fulfill the position of a social worker or social services clinician, a position for which she did not maintain the qualifications to hold, circumventing the established processes of government for filling the position provided in the merit system.  The individual was the paramour of Sumner’s friend and golfing partner.  Sumner further used his position to influence his agency to continue to employ the individual for two more years after she demonstrated that she did not maintain the skills necessary to perform the duties assigned to her nor to fulfill the task for which she was originally hired.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Sumner paid a $1,000.00 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Sumner is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission vs. Phillip Haney15-018
Haney admitted to one count of violating the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as a Social Services Clinician, District 2, Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet. During 2015, Haney used his position to become “friends” on social media with approximately one hundred and forty (140) offenders, some of whom he provided services to as a Social Services Clinician for alcohol and drug counseling.   Haney used his social media account and his access with the offenders served by his Department to attempt to instigate a for-profit business selling supplements.  Haney solicited the offenders who were his “friends” on the social media site to enter into a for-profit business relationship with him to work as his representatives selling supplements for his website “Success with Phill.”  Haney approached at least one offender in person to participate in the personal for-profit business.
Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, Haney agreed to pay a $1,250.00 civil penalty, receive a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Haney is no longer employed by the Commonwealth
Attachments: Attachment
expand Issuing Year : 2014 ‎(27)
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Benjamin Kinman14-004
That during the course of his employment as the Deputy Commissioner of the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet, Kinman violated the Code of Ethics by using his position to instruct Department employees, who were working on state time and using Department equipment and vehicles, to pump out the flooded basement or crawl space of then Commissioner Jonathan Gassett’s personal residence.  Kinman also admitted that he violated the Code of Ethics by using his position to have a Department employee, working on state time and using a Department vehicle, deliver fish from the Department’s fish hatchery to a private pond located on the personal property of a member of the Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Commission, outside of the provisions of any statute or regulation and were unavailable to members of the general public; and by using his position, at the request of a member of the Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Commission, to deliver fish from the Department’s fish hatchery to a private pond on the personal property of a friend of the Commission member.  Kinman delivered the fish himself in the fall of 2012 and instructed Department employees, working on state time and using a Department vehicle, to make the fish delivery in the spring of 2013.  The fish were provided to the friend of the Commission member outside of the provisions of any statute or regulation and were unavailable to members of the general public.
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Kinman agreed to pay a $2,999 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Brian Wright14-021
That during the course of his employment as a Maintenance Superintendent at Green River Youth Development Center, Department of Juvenile Justice, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, Wright admitted violating the Code of Ethics by using a facility credit card to purchase various items that he then took to his home for his personal use.  The total value of the items Wright took to his home for his personal use was over $350.  On at least one of the receipts for the credit card purchases, Wright placed his subordinate’s signature without the subordinate’s permission.  Wright then submitted the deceptive receipt to the facility.
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Wright agreed to pay a $2500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Wright is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Charles Geveden, Sr.12-009
That during the course of his employment as the Deputy Secretary of the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, he violated the Code of Ethics by using his influence in a matter that involved a substantial conflict between his personal or private interest and his duties in the public interest; used his official position to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for others in derogation of the public interest; and used his position to influence an agency in derogation of the state at large.

Specifically Geveden admitted that he contacted multiple subordinate employees of departments within the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet to influence these individuals to make donations in support of Governor Steve Beshear’s 2011 re-election campaign.  During these conversations, Geveden referred to the individual employee’s position and provided a specific dollar amount for the employee to donate in support of the campaign.  Geveden stated to these individuals that this dollar amount was based upon their employment position or the salary that they received as employees within the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.  He contacted these subordinate employees on their privately-listed home phone numbers and personal cell phone numbers to which he gained access through the personnel files and internal agency documents maintained at the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.    

Geveden also admitted that, while on state time, he entered the office of a subordinate employee and asked the subordinate to solicit campaign contributions from certain individual employees who were under the subordinate’s supervision.  During this encounter, Geveden attempted to provide the subordinate with a list of the employees Geveden wanted him to solicit.  This list included the individual employees’ salaries and the amounts of their expected campaign donations.
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Geveden paid a $5000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Geveden is no longer employed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Clifton E. Brown14-007
That during the course of his employment as a Licensing Administrator in the Division of Licensing, Kentucky Horse Racing Commission, Brown violated the Code of Ethics by maintaining possession of cash that he collected through his regular duties as a License Administrator for weeks at a time for his own use and enjoyment before finally depositing the cash.  The Racing Commission’s policy included a requirement that License Administrators deposit all cash and checks collected through the administration of licenses at the various racetracks on a daily basis. 

Brown also admitted that he violated the Code of Ethics by performing activities related to gambling while on state time and frequently using state resources.  Brown would use the complimentary racing forms, which were provided to the Racing Commission by the racetracks for the purposes of determining potential licensees, for his own interests of researching and “handicapping” potential bets.  Brown would frequently place bets while working at the racetracks as a License Administrator.
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Brown agreed to pay a $1500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Brown is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Dwayne Mills13-010
Mills admitted that during the course of his employment as Superintendent of the Adair Youth Development Center, Department of Juvenile Justice, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, he used a subordinate employee to place bets on college and professional sporting events on his behalf through a bookie.  He would text or call this employee, often while the employee was on state time while working shift at the facility, and require this employee to deviate from his required duties managing staff and juveniles at the facility to place bets for Mills ranging between $25 and $100 on upwards of hundreds of sporting events over a two year period.  Mills also used this subordinate employee to carry money to and from the bookie on his behalf, giving the employee money to pay for bets that he lost and having the employee carry money to him for bets that he won over a two year period.

Mills also used state time and resources to view websites devoted to betting sporting events and to research point spreads before instructing the subordinate employee to place the bets for him; and when Mills was not at the facility, he would contact the employee at the facility and instruct the employee to use state time and resources to research point spreads and betting statistics for him.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Mills agreed to pay a $4500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Fran Pinkston13-012
That following her employment as an officer in the Tourism, Arts, and Heritage Cabinet, Department of Parks, Ms. Pinkston violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by failing to file a completed 2012 Statement of Financial Disclosure within the time period required by statute for the portion of calendar year 2012 during which she was employed.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Pinkston admitted violating the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by failing to file the completed 2012 Statement of Financial Disclosure within the time period required by statute, agreed to pay a $100 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Pinkston had previously filed the required Statement of Financial Disclosure.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Gary Gardner14-002
That during the course of his employment as Fiscal Officer, Lincoln Village Detention Center, Department of Juvenile Justice, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, Gardner violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by using his position to use a credit card belonging to the facility for personal use without the consent of the facility.  Gardner spent approximately $2650 on items for his personal use with the facility credit card.  Gardner also took approximately $650 from the sale of meal tickets at the facility for his own personal use. 
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission Gardner admitted violating the Executive Branch Code of Ethics, agreed to pay a $1000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 

Gardner previously entered a plea of guilty for criminal charges in state court in relation to this conduct, which included agreeing to serve a minimum of one year concurrent on two Counts, which was diverted for a period of two years, and paying a total of $3,381.00 in restitution.

Gardner is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Gerald Buynack14-013
That during the course of his employment as the Assistant Director, Fisheries Division, Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet, Buynack  violated the Code of Ethics by using his position, at the request of a former Department employee, to influence Department employees, working on state time and using a Department vehicle, to deliver fish from the Department’s fish hatchery to a private pond located on the personal property of the former Department employee.  The fish were provided to the former Department employee without having to complete an application, at no charge for the fish or the cost of delivery, outside of the provisions of any statute or regulation, and would not have been made available to members of the general public.
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Buynak agreed to pay a $900 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Jeffrey Dean14-020
That during the course of his employment as a Certified Psychological Associate II in the Mental Health Branch of the Department of Juvenile Justice, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, Dean violated the Code of Ethics by failing to perform visits on at least 19 occasions with five juveniles he was assigned to counsel while indicating to his supervisor and on documentation he submitted to the Department that he had in fact performed the visits. 

Dean also admitted that he used his official position to falsify official documentation in order to make it appear that he was performing his job duties when in fact he was not.  This included submitting monthly activity reports to his supervisor that were inaccurate in order to make it appear that he was performing bi-monthly visits with juveniles that were assigned to him who were supposed to be receiving sex offender counseling; and submitting falsified travel vouchers consistent with the falsified documentation and inaccurate activity reports for which he received reimbursement.  Further, Dean submitted falsified timesheets to reflect that he had performed his job duties for the times that he did not actually perform the visits with the juveniles for which he was compensated.
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Dean agreed to pay a $2000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Dean is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. John Akers14-005
That during the course of his employment as the supervisor of the Facilities Maintenance Branch woodshop, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Akers admitted he violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by  using his position to use the Department’s woodshop facilities to store his personal property, including, but not limited to, tools, duck decoys, boats, building materials, personal hunting equipment, and a motorcycle; using his position to use the Department’s woodshop facilities and equipment to build and repair his personal items, including but not limited to building a flat bottom boat and a wine cabinet and repairing his personal deer stand and lawn mowing equipment; using his position to possess seized antlers that were sent to the Department’s woodshop to be destroyed, and using these antlers to build turkey calls, coat racks, furniture, and various items using the Department’s facilities and equipment, some of which he kept for his personal use; and using his position to use the Department’s facilities, employees, and equipment to perform personal work for other Department employees, including the Department’s commissioner.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Akers agreed to pay a $3500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Jonathan Gassett14-003
That during his course of employment as the Commissioner of the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, within the Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet, Gassett admitted he violated the Code of Ethics by using his influence in matters that involved substantial conflict between his personal or private interest and his duties in the public interest; influenced a public agency in derogation of the state at large; used his official position to give himself financial gain and advantage in derogation of the public interest at large; used his official position to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself in derogation of the public interest; and failed to avoid all conduct which might in any way lead members of the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his professional or private interest.

Specifically, Gassett used his position to have Department employees, working on state time and using Department equipment and vehicles, pump out the flooded basement or crawl space of his personal residence; pick up building materials from a business in Lexington which were delivered to the Department’s woodshop in Frankfort and stored there until delivered to Gassett’s personal residence for his personal use; and perform other personal work for him, including helping Gassett repair a dent in his personal canoe and cutting pieces of countertop with Department equipment to be installed in Gassett’s personal residence.  In the settlement agreement, Gassett also admitted that he used his position to direct a Department employee to leave his work station during regular working hours and to miss a scheduled meeting so that the employee could perform an inspection of a home that Gassett planned to purchase.  The employee used his personal leave time to perform this personal work for Gassett, and was not compensated by Gassett for his services. 



Gassett further admitted that he used his position to have Department employees acquire a gallon of the controlled chemical rotenone, that was originally purchased by the Department through a Department contract, from the Department’s stores for his personal use.  The rotenone Gassett used could only be purchased by a certified individual, and Gassett did not maintain the appropriate certification to purchase or use rotenone at the time.  Gassett also admitted that he used his position to acquire 15 prints of artwork, valued at $35 a print, which had been created by a Department employee to be sold for fundraising purposes by the Department.  Gassett did not pay the Department for these prints.  Gassett also admitted that he used his position to use the Department’s account with FedEx to have personal items shipped for his personal interests, including using the Department’s FedEx account number to have the skin of an alligator he had killed in Florida delivered to a taxidermist in Georgia.

Furthermore, Gassett admitted that he used his position to give the owner of Frankfort Communications, Jimmy Miller, an advantage by allowing Miller to attend a meeting with the executive staff of the Kentucky State Police and the Department, at which it was discussed the Department’s options in using the KSP communications systems and updating the Department’s radio equipment.  Gassett frequently socialized and hunted with Jimmy Miller at Miller’s personal property.  No other representatives of prospective vendors or authorized Kenwood dealers were invited to attend the meeting.   

Gassett also admitted in the settlement agreement that he used his position and the relationship that he developed through his position to influence the Kentucky State Police to provide him with KSP guest passes to the Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs at no charge.  The KSP guest passes gave Gassett access to multiple levels of Churchill Downs on Derby Day.  Gassett used these passes for his personal pleasure and not during the course of his regular duties as Commissioner.   These passes are not made available by KSP to the general public.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Gassett paid a $7500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Gassett is no longer employed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Kendall Williams14-009
That during the course of his employment as a Superintendent at the Bowling Green Group Home, Department of Juvenile Justice, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, he used his position to wrongfully acquire a $100 bill from a youth. 

Williams did so by transporting the youth, upon the youth’s release from the group home, to a bank in order for the youth to cash a paycheck, from which Williams took a $100 bill.  Williams indicated to the youth that the $100 would be considered a “donation” to the group home, but he never created the proper paper work to designate the cash as a donation, but instead placed the $100 bill in his desk for his own use.  The youth contacted Williams to request the $100 bill be returned to him; however, Williams refused and proceeded to thwart the youth’s communications with the facility.  The $100 bill was never used as a donation for the facility, but rather stayed in Williams’ possession.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Williams paid a $1000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Liberty Campbell14-022
Campbell admitted that during the course of her employment as a Probation and Parole Officer with the Department of Corrections, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, she violated the Code of Ethics by using her influence to pressure an employee of the Letcher County Commonwealth Attorney’s office to fraudulently issue a Grand Jury Subpoena Duces Tecum to obtain the cell phone records from Appalachian Wireless for a cell phone used by Campell’s husband to gather information she intended to use for her own personal purposes unrelated to her duties as a public servant.  Furthermore, Campbell waited approximately eleven months in which to inform her supervisor of her conduct in order to conceal the improper conduct to garner the use of a Grand Jury subpoena for her personal interests, only telling her supervisor of her transgression once she believed the conduct would be revealed.
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Campbell agreed to pay a $1500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Campbell is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Lonnie Culver14-022
Culver admitted that the evidence shows that during the course of his employment as the Deputy Adjutant General, Kentucky National Guard, Department of Military Affairs, while also serving as the Commander of the 38th Infantry Division of the Indiana National Guard, he violated the Code of Ethics by using a Kentucky National Guard helicopter, to which he had access and use of for his duties as the Kentucky Deputy Adjutant General, to fly from Louisville, Kentucky, to inactive duty training in Indianapolis, Indiana, with a return flight to Louisville on the same day.  National Guard policy requires soldiers to travel to inactive duty training at their own expense.  Furthermore, on several occasions Culver also violated the Code of Ethics by using a Kentucky National Guard vehicle, to which he had access and use of for his duties as the Kentucky Deputy Adjutant General, to drive from Louisville, Kentucky, to inactive duty training with the 38th Infantry Division of the Indiana National Guard in Indianapolis, Indiana, despite National Guard policy that soldiers must travel to inactive duty training at their own expense. 
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Culver agreed to pay a $2000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Mark Roberts14-010
That during the course of his employment as the Game Management Foreman of the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet, Roberts violated the Code of Ethics by using his position to direct employees under his supervision, which he knew were working on state time, to use Department equipment and vehicles to travel to the personal residence of then Commissioner Jonathan Gassett and pump out water from Commissioner Gassett’s flooded basement or crawl space; and directed these employees to code their timesheets to indicate that they were performing regular maintenance activities to conceal the time in which the employees were actually working at Commissioner Gassett’s home.  Roberts also admitted that he violated the Code of Ethics by directing Department employees that he knew to be working on state time to use Department vehicles and equipment to deliver fish from the Department’s fish hatchery to private ponds located on the personal property of a member of the Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Commission and the friend of a member of the Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Commission.  The fish were provided to the Commission member and the friend of the Commission member outside of the provisions of any statute or regulation and would not have been made available to members of the general public.  Roberts also used his position to direct these employees to fail to make fish delivery cards when delivering fish to the private ponds, which deviated from the normal practices of the Department, to interfere with the proper documentation for the fish deliveries
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Roberts agreed to pay a $2000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Mary C. Callahan13-011
Callahan was found to have violated the Code of Ethics following her employment as an officer in the Tourism, Arts, and Heritage Cabinet, Department of Parks, by failing to file a completed Statement of Financial Disclosure for the portion of calendar year 2012 during which she was employed by the Tourism, Arts, and Heritage Cabinet.  
The Final Order followed the issuance of a Recommended Order of Default by an impartial hearing officer assigned to the case, subsequent to Callahan’s failure to participate in the administrative proceeding process.  In the Final Order, the Commission adopted the hearing officer’s Recommended Order finding Callahan to be in default, publicly reprimanded Callahan for her conduct, and ordered her to pay a civil penalty in the amount of $1,000.  Callahan has the right to appeal the Final Order in Circuit Court.  She is no longer employed by the Commonwealth. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Michelle Jones14-019
That during the course of her employment as the Family Services Office Supervisor, Department for Community Based Services for the Two Rivers Service Region, Cabinet for Health and Family Services, she violated the Code of Ethics by using her position to represent her agency in negotiating transactions to have her agency do business with a business owned and operated by her husband to provide promotional products for events held by her Department for a program that she coordinated as part of her regular job duties.

Jones also admitted that she violated the Code of Ethics by using her position to ensure that her agency did business with a a business owned and operated by her husband and for which she was listed as a manager on the business's Articles of Incorporation filed with the Secretary of State's office.  Jones Also violated the outside employment provision of the Code of Ethics by being the "manager" for her husband's business without the approval of her appointing authority while she was a full-time employee of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Jones agreed to pay a $3,250 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Rachel Auxier14-08
That during the course of her employment as Director, Department for Income Support, Cabinet for Health and Family Services she violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by using her position to have her agency do business with a business owned and operated by her husband, to provide catering for an event being held by her Department.  Auxier had her subordinate staff gather estimates from entities of her choosing, including her husband’s business, and create documentation to show that her husband’s business was the lowest estimate gathered.  She also used her position to have her upper management involved in the approval process believe that her husband’s business was the lowest estimate and the only option to provide the catering for the event.  Further, Auxier signed the documentation approving her husband’s business to provide catering for the event
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Auxier admitted violating the Executive Branch Code of Ethics, agreed to pay a $3000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Richie Farmer13-01
That Farmer, the former Commissioner of Agriculture, violated the Executive Branch Ethics Code by means of the following misconduct:

1) Influencing the creation of non-merit positions with no specific job duties and placing his friends in these positions, then making use of some of these state employees to perform personal errands for him during work hours; as well as influencing the placement of individuals into higher paying non-merit positions while commandeering the duties and responsibilities of lesser paying merit positions for these non-merits, then oftentimes letting the individuals in the non-merit positions fail to perform their assigned duties.
2) Using his influence to interfere with the hiring of merit employees, often in contravention to the recommendations of the appropriate staff and the interview panels, frequently influencing the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (“KDA”) to hire individuals with political or personal connections to himself without regard to the individual’s merit.
3) Enabling individual employees to claim work time without the employees actually performing work-related activities for the KDA.
4) Using KDA employees, often on state time and using state resources, to chauffeur him and his family to doctors’ appointments, personal shopping trips, and hunting trips, even once directing KDA employees to chauffeur the family dog from the Kentucky State Fair to Farmer’s home in Frankfort; and also using KDA employees, often on state time and using state resources, to perform personal work for him at his personal residence, including building a basketball court and retaining wall in his back yard, moving furniture to and from his personal residence, doing landscaping and yard work, cleaning his garage, and laying tile and building shelves.
5) Using state time and resources to have the KDA provide his extended family with hotel rooms while attending the Kentucky State Fair, and using his position to influence KDA employees to fraudulently reserve those hotel rooms in the names of KDA employees he knew would not be utilizing the rooms in order for his extended family to occupy those rooms.
6) Using his position to abuse a state contract by giving tickets to the Kentucky High School Athletic Association’s Sweet Sixteen Basketball Tournament (“Sweet Sixteen”), which were provided to the KDA pursuant to the contract, to his extended family members.
7) Using state time and resources to have the KDA provide his extended family with hotel rooms to attend the Sweet Sixteen tournament.
8) Soliciting donations, or directing KDA staff to do so, for the Southern Association of State Departments of Agriculture (“SASDA”) conference to be held in Kentucky in 2008 from entities that the KDA regulated or with which it had a business relationship, as well as from entities that represented groups that the KDA regulated.
9) Using his position to influence employees within the KDA to spend state funds comingled with solicited funds from outside entities for the 2008 SASDA conference to purchase excessive and lavish gifts for visiting Agriculture Commissioners and himself in derogation of the public interest and the state at large; and using his position to influence employees within the KDA to also spend those funds to take the visiting Agriculture Commissioners’ wives on shopping trips to Fayette Mall, giving them $50 gift cards as spending money, on a children’s program for only Farmer’s children in which KDA employees took Farmer’s children to a water park and other activities for the entire conference, on a trip totaling in excess of $30,000 to Millionaire’s Row at Churchill Downs for gambling on races named for the visiting Agriculture Commissioners, and on opulent meals and entertainment all in derogation of the state interest.
10) Using his position to influence employees within KDA to spend exorbitant amounts of state funds comingled with solicited funds from outside entities on gifts for the 2008 SASDA conference, forcing these employees to take desperate measures to find supplemental funds to pay for the SASDA conference in derogation of the state interest.  The measures taken by these employees included charging the KDA for employee registrations to the conference for employees who did not actually attend the conference, granting money to a commodity group with the requirement that the commodity group use the majority of the grant money to pay for SASDA expenses incurred by KDA, and to continue soliciting funds for SASDA from outside groups months after the SASDA conference occurred.
11) Using his position to take personal possession of four firearms and carry cases, which were purchased with state funds and funds donated for the 2008 SASDA conference, that were meant as gifts for visiting Agriculture Commissioners either who did not ultimately attend the SASDA conference or who declined to accept the gift. 
12) Directing KDA staff to use state resources and funds donated for the 2008 SASDA conference to order eight extra firearms and carry cases, in excess of the 17 firearms and cases ordered as gifts for visiting Agriculture Commissioners, then taking possession of these extra firearms for his own personal benefit.
13) Directing KDA staff to use state resources and funds donated for the 2008 SASDA conference to order approximately 35 extra Case knives, in excess of the 17 knives ordered as gifts for visiting Agriculture Commissioners, then taking possession of these extra knives for his own personal benefit. 
14) Directing KDA staff to use state resources and funds donated for the 2008 SASDA conference to order approximately 33 extra cigar boxes, in excess of the 17 cigar boxes ordered as gifts for visiting Agriculture Commissioners, then taking possession of these extra cigar boxes for his own personal benefit. 
15) Directing KDA staff to use state resources and funds donated for the 2008 SASDA conference to purchase excessive amounts of food, candy, alcohol, and other items over and above the amount of items necessary for the registered attendants at the SASDA conference, and, after the conference ended, directing the staff to relinquish these extra items to his spouse who took possession of these items for Farmer’s personal benefit; and doing the same for items, including alcohol, solicited from and donated directly by outside entities for the 2008 SASDA conference.
16) Using state time and resources to provide his extended family members with hotel rooms at the hotel where SASDA was held and waiving registration fees for his family members to participate in the conference.
17) Using his position to acquire, for his personal use, the hotel rewards points for a conference held by KDA that were accrued by the KDA from the rooms occupied by employees and out-of-state travelers to the conference.
18) Directing KDA staff, after the SASDA conference, to use state resources and donated funds devoted for the SASDA conference to purchase approximately 111 extra watches, in excess of the approximately 64 watches ordered as gifts for KDA employees who worked on the conference, then taking possession of these extra watches for his own personal benefit.
19) Using his position to influence a Kentucky Proud vendor, who was making wooden hats as gifts for the visiting Agriculture Commissioners attending the SASDA Conference, to make additional hats, valued at $600 each, for free for his family members and himself, as well as wooden bowls for his family members, promising the hat maker that Farmer would give the hat maker special treatment within the Gubernatorial administration in return.
20) Using his position, on two different occasions, to direct a KDA employee to use donated and purchased Kentucky Proud items to make over a dozen total gift baskets for Farmer’s personal benefit.  Farmer directed the employee to relinquish these gift baskets to his former spouse.  The employee was required to use state time and resources, as well as her personal funds, to make these gift baskets for Farmer.  On the second occasion, the KDA submitted to Farmer an invoice for the cost of the gift baskets, which Farmer never paid to the KDA. 
21) Using his position to direct a KDA employee to use a state Procurement Card (“ProCard”) to purchase a refrigerator that he gave to his former spouse to use at her workplace outside of state government.
22) Using his position on multiple occasions to direct KDA employees to use state funds to purchase in excess of 50 shirts for his own personal benefit from a KDA vendor. 
23) Using his position to direct KDA employees to deliver to his home three laptop computers that had been purchased by the KDA for the use of three KDA employees.  Farmer gave these computers to his family for their personal use and benefit. 
24) Using his position to direct KDA employees to purchase filing cabinets in excess of $600 with locks, which were delivered to his home.  These filing cabinets were never returned to the KDA after Farmer’s term in office was complete.  
25) Receiving gifts such as a wooden cowboy hat with the Kentucky Proud Logo, valued at $1200-$1500, and a firearm, priced at $449, from attending the 2008 SASDA conference in Kentucky, as well as a wooden “UK” baseball cap, valued at $1200-$1500, and wooden hat stand with “32” engraving, valued at $250, from a Kentucky Proud vendor, which Farmer failed to report on Statements of Financial Disclosure filed with the Executive Branch Ethics Commission.
26) Receiving complimentary tickets for various functions through his position as Commissioner, including, but not limited to, tickets to the Kentucky Oaks and Derby, the Sweet Sixteen tournament, and events held at the Kentucky Exposition Center.  Farmer oftentimes sold these tickets for an amount greatly exceeding the face value of the ticket, and in the case of the Derby tickets, received in excess of $1000 for these tickets.  Farmer failed to report receiving these sources of income beyond his salary as Commissioner on his Statements of Financial Disclosure filed with the Executive Branch Ethics Commission during each of his eight years in office.  
27) Failing to file a timely and complete his 2011 Statement of Financial Disclosure within the time period required by statute for calendar year 2011 during which he served as the Commissioner of Agriculture. 
28) Interfering with the KDA’s grant-giving process by instructing KDA employees to award the remainder of outstanding grant money to a grantee, which was a business managed by a former University of Kentucky basketball player, that was not performing according to the terms of the grant agreement.
29) Using his position to influence a private business to give him two all-terrain vehicles for his personal use and one all-terrain vehicle for his father’s personal use in exchange for the promise of grant money from the KDA.
30) Using his position to attempt to influence KDA employees to grant a for-profit business state funds in the form of grant money as compensation for three all-terrain vehicles that the business had given Farmer for his and his father’s personal use.
31) Using his position to influence his agency to use $20,000 in Kentucky Proud funds to sponsor a racing team owned by a member of his family.  
32) Using his position to influence KDA management personnel to give an employee, who was a KDA inspector and an extended family member of Farmer, a vehicle without a GPS unit despite the employee’s supervisor showing Farmer evidence that this employee had tampered with his GPS unit on multiple occasions and was using the vehicle for his personal business and otherwise failing to perform his job duties.  
33) Submitting to the Kentucky Registry of Election Finance (“the Registry”), in response to an audit being conducted by the Registry of Farmer’s campaign account for his second bid for Commissioner, copies of receipts that were not his own, but were incurred by his sister who was a current employee of the Registry, which had been used by Farmer to gain reimbursement for himself from his campaign account in derogation of the state at large.   The receipts were for gas and food expenses incurred by Farmer’s sister on her personal time and not by Farmer for any campaign-related expenses.
34) Submitting to the Registry, in response to an audit being conducted by the Registry of Farmer’s campaign account for his second bid for Commissioner, a letter, that he knew had been drafted by his sister who was a current employee of the Registry, which was misleading concerning the legitimacy of his campaign reimbursements and in derogation of the state at large.
35) Influencing the KDA to hire an individual with whom he had an ongoing intimate relationship and place her under his direct supervision.  This individual was placed into a position with a significantly higher salary than the previous holder of the position.  Farmer allowed this individual to claim work time without the individual actually performing work-related activities for the KDA.  Farmer allowed this individual to continue to falsely claim work time over a six-week interval over the objection of management within the KDA.  Farmer directed management to sign timesheets for this individual even though Farmer and management had knowledge that she was not performing state work during the time claimed on her timesheets and was not present at her assigned work station for long intervals during which she claimed state time on her timesheets.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission Farmer admitted to all of the allegations contained in the Commission’s March 18, 2013, Initiating Order.  The only concession in regard to these ethics charges was an agreement by the Commission to combine some of the 42 counts contained in the Initiating Order that were closely related.  The end result was an admission by Farmer to 35 counts of violating the Executive Branch Code of Ethics.

In addition, as part of the settlement agreement, Farmer agreed to pay a $63,000 civil penalty, agreed to cooperate with the Commission in any further investigations and proceedings, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The settlement remained contingent upon the plea agreement Farmer entered in his federal criminal proceeding being accepted by the Federal Court.  That plea was accepted by the Federal Court on January 14, 2014, with Farmer being sentenced to 27 months in federal prison, with a term of supervised release of one year, and ordered to pay $120,500 in restitution to the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

The Commission’s Final Order concluded this matter.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Rick Gortney14-014
That during the course of his employment as a Transportation Engineering Technologist III with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Gortney violated the Code of Ethics by used his position to sell property owned by the Cabinet to his brother-in-law for his own personal financial benefit or gain.  The property included a trailer that had been purchased for use by the Cabinet as office space, which was slated to be sold at auction.   Instead of selling the trailer at auction, Gortney sold the trailer directly to his brother-in-law, who wrote a $2000 personal check to Gortney, who cashed the check and kept the proceeds of the sale for himself.
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Gortney agreed to pay a $2,000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Gortney is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Ronald Brooks14-011
That during the course of his employment as the Director, Fisheries Division, Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet, Brooks violated the Code of Ethics by using his position, at the request of then Commissioner Jonathan Gassett, to instruct a Department employee to acquire a gallon of the controlled chemical Rotenone, that was originally purchased by the Department through a Department contract, from the Department’s stores for Gassett’s personal use.  The Rotenone Gassett used could only be purchased by a certified individual.  The Department did not have a law or regulation that allowed the Department to sell or provide Rotenone to the public.  Gassett did not maintain the appropriate certification to purchase or use Rotenone at the time; nevertheless, Brooks ensured that Gassett received the Rotenone from the Department’s supplies. 
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Brooks agreed to pay a $900 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Scott King14-006
King admitted that during the course of his employment as the Assistant Director of the Division of Administrative Services, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Tourism, Arts, and Heritage Cabinet, he violated the Code of Ethics by using his position on multiple occasions to obtain use of the Department’s John Deere tractor, which was purchased with federal funds for a program that had been discontinued.  King used the tractor for his personal use and enjoyment to improve the land of a commercial property, which he did not own, but used for his own personal hunting purposes.  King then damaged the Department’s equipment while in his possession and had the Department pay for the cost of the repairs. The repairs were paid out of Federal grant money. 

Also in the Settlement Agreement King agreed not to contest charges that he violated the Code of Ethics by using his position to create an oppressive and hostile atmosphere in his division to suit his own prurient, personal interests.  King used his position as supervisor to tell subordinate employees to wear certain articles of clothing he favored, to wear short skirts and high heels to meetings to receive a favorable result, and on one occasion told an employee to allow him to see her breasts for favorable treatment.  Further, during staff meetings, King would use his position as supervisor to point out to his female subordinates which of their body parts he and other male superiors preferred.
In the Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, King agreed to pay a $2750 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  King is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Steve Marple14-012
That during the course of his employment as the Manager of the Pfeiffer Fish Hatchery, Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet, Marple violated the Code of Ethics by using his position to reserve fish from the Preiffer Fish Hatchery that were intended for use in Department programs, for delivery to private ponds located on the personal property of a member of the Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Commission, the friend of a member of the Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Commission, and a former Department employee.  The fish were provided to the Commission member, the friend of the Commission member, and the former employee outside of the provisions of any statute or regulation and would not have been made available to members of the general public.
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Marple agreed to pay a $900 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Steven Mobley13-06
That during the course of his employment as the Director of Agriculture Marketing and Agribusiness Recruitment in the Department of Agriculture during the Richie Farmer administration, Mobley violated the Code of Ethics by failing to report receiving any gifts in excess of $200 dollars on his 2008 Statement of Financial Disclosure filed with the Ethics Commission when he had in fact received a gift in the form of a wooden hat valued at approximately $600 from a Kentucky Proud vendor.

Additionally, while not admitting that his conduct violated the Code of Ethics but recognizing that the evidence against him indicated he had, for the purposes of settlement Mobley agreed not to contest charges that he violated the Code of Ethics by reporting time on his brother William E. Mobley’s time sheets which enabled his brother to collect pay for time he did not work and to receive compensation while failing to fulfill his assigned job duties; and that he violated the Code of Ethics by reporting that his brother used his personal vehicle to travel for the Department, which allowed his brother to collect reimbursement for mileage for travel that he did not actually incur in the performance of duties for the Department.
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Mobley paid a $2500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Mobley is no longer employed by the Executive Branch of the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Thomas Burling13-013
That while serving as a Highway Superintendent II with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Burling was found to have violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by using his position to gain access to property owned by the Cabinet and property owned by a Cabinet contractor for the purposes of hauling that property to a scrap yard and selling this property for his own personal financial benefit or gain.  The property included corrugated metal pipe, rebar, metal pipes, aluminum cans, tires, double-mesh wire, scrap metal, road sign poles, SuperNails, steel sheets, chain-link fence, and a metal hose reel.  Burling was also violated the Code of Ethics by using his position to misuse his Cabinet-issued ProCard to purchase items for his own personal use or that he otherwise kept for himself for personal gain or benefit.  These items included floor mats and an orbital sander and accessories.   Burling entered false information into the Cabinet’s ProCard system to cover up his activities.  He further violated the Code of Ethics by using an open Cabinet charge account to purchase items for his own personal use, and took cleaning supplies and toilet paper from the facility for his personal use and enjoyment as well.

Burling was further found to have violated the Code of Ethics by misusing inmates, whom he was charged with supervising, by having these inmates perform unauthorized work on private property for activities not related to work for the Cabinet, but for his own private enterprise.  Burling gave these inmates the proceeds from the sale of Cabinet scrap metal that they had collected and he sold.  He also falsified his timesheets and failed to carry out assignments as directed by his supervisors, and directed a subordinate to falsify his timesheets.  Burling also used state time, state-owned vehicles, and Department equipment for his personal use both during and after working hours.

Additionally, Burling violated the Code of Ethics by falsifying his application for employment for a promotion to Highway Superintendent II by stating that he had not been previously convicted of a felony offense, when in fact he had.
The Final Order followed the issuance of a Recommended Order of Default by an impartial hearing officer assigned to the case, subsequent to Burling’s failure to participate in the administrative proceeding process.  In the Final Order, the Commission adopted the hearing officer’s Recommended Order finding Burling to be in default, publicly reprimanded Burling for his conduct, and ordered him to pay a civil penalty in the amount of $35,000.  Burling has the right to appeal the Final Order in Circuit Court.  He is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. William E. Mobley13-05
That during the course of his employment as a Staff Assistant with the Department of Agriculture during the Richie Farmer administration he violated the Code of Ethics by collecting pay for time claimed on his time sheets for which he failed to fulfill his assigned job duties but received compensation.  Mobley was assigned the duties of a Stockyard Market Reporter which required him to appear at designated stockyards and create market reports of the stockyard’s activities for the Department’s market news.  Mobley consistently failed to appear at these stockyards and failed to make market reports of the activities of the stockyards. 

Mobley also admitted that he violated the Code of Ethics by consistently failing to appear at his designated stockyards, but nevertheless collecting reimbursement for mileage for travel to these stockyards that he did not incur in the performance of his duties. 
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Mobley paid a $3000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Mobley is no longer employed by the Commonwealth.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Zane Alexander14-001
That during the course of his employment as a Transportation Engineer Supervisor, District Nine, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Alexander violated the Code of Ethics by conducted surveying activities for Phoenix Engineering, a company owned and operated by his spouse and daughter, which undertook a subcontract with another contractor which was under contract and performed work for the Transportation Cabinet for a project in Harrison County.  The surveys that Alexander performed for Phoenix were conducted at the behest of the other contractor in completion of the Harrison County project for the Transportation Cabinet, which paid that contractor for the surveying activities.  That contractor in turn paid Phoenix Engineering through the subcontract for the surveying activities that were performed by Alexander.  Alexander thus benefited from Phoenix Engineering’s subcontract with the contractor that had the contract with his own agency, the Transportation Cabinet.
In a Settlement Agreement, approved by the Commission, Alexander agreed to pay a $2,500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order
Attachments: Attachment
expand Issuing Year : 2013 ‎(7)
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Bruce Harper13-02
While employed as the Director of Outreach and Development, Kentucky Department of Agriculture, Harper used his official position to solicit donations for the Southern Association of State Departments of Agriculture ("SASDA") conference to be held in Kentucky in 2008 from entities that Agriculture regulated, did business with, or represented groups that Agriculture regulated, that he interfered with the enforcement and penalty procedures of the Office of the State Veterinarian by instructing Agriculture employees to probate a $200 fine to zero for a farmer who had violated the dead animal disposal laws; and that he attempted to interfere with the enforcement and penalty procedures of the Division of Regulation and Inspection, Grain Regulation Branch, on behalf of a grain dealer that was a political contributor.  Specifically Harper instructed an Agriculture employee to hold a $3,000 penalty check submitted by a grain dealer, even though the grain dealer had already entered into an Agreed Order of Settlement to pay a fine of $3,000 for violating Kentucky's grain law.  Harper instructed the employee not to deposit the check, the normal course of business upon receiving a penalty check, but to hold the check until he could come to the Grain Regulation Branch offices and take possession of the check, with the intention of circumventing the check's deposit.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Harper agreed to pay a $4,500 Civil Penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Chris Parsons13-03
While employed as an Agricultural Inspector I, Office of State Veterinarian, Kentucky Department of Agriculture, Parsons violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by claiming work time on his timesheets for time spent allegedly observing stockyard sales and performing inspections while consistently failing to appear at these stockyards, thereby collecting pay for time that he falsely reported on his timesheets;  and when management reassigned his work station to Frankfort so as to closely monitor his work activities, Parsons failed to appear in Frankfort but claimed work time on his timesheets and did not otherwise perform any work-related activities for the Department, yet used his state-issued fuel card to purchase fuel on six occasions during that time period for personal use.

Parsons also admitted that while employed as an Agricultural Inspector I, Weights and Measures Branch, Division of Regulation and Inspection, Kentucky Department of Agriculture, he violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by consistently claiming work time on his timesheets for time that he did not work while assigned the duties of testing scales at various gas stations and grocery stores, thereby collecting wages and benefits for time that he falsely reported on his timesheets and, further, failing to fulfill his assigned job duties while receiving compensation; and by using his state vehicle for non-work related reasons, driving the vehicle for extended periods of time through areas not included in his assigned region, while failing to perform any work related activities during this time, thereby using state resources for his own personal benefit.
In the Settlement Agreement , Parsons agreed to pay a $5,000 civil penalty, received a pbulic reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Donald Nolan13-009
That while employed as a Transportation Engineering Technologist III in District 11, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Nolan violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by consistently leaving assigned job sites early and failing to perform or complete surveys while nevertheless claiming work time on his timesheets for time spent allegedly performing those surveys, thereby collecting pay for time he falsely reported on his timesheets and failing to fulfill his assigned job duties while receiving compensation; by claiming overtime on every timesheet submitted during the period reviewed even though he consistently left early from his assigned job sites, thereby collecting compensatory hours for time he falsely reported on his timesheets and failing to fulfill his assigned job duties; and by conducting surveying activities through his private enterprise at locations of construction sites that were not Transportation Cabinet work sites while using a state vehicle.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Nolan agreed ot pay a $3,000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. George "Doug" Begley13-04
While employed as an Agricultural Inspector I, Office of Consumer and Environmental Protection, Kentucky Department of Agriculture, Begley violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by claiming work time on his timesheets for time spent allegedly performing amusement ride inspections while consistently failing to perform these inspections, thereby collecting pay for time he falsely reported on his timesheets; by using his assigned state vehicle on days that he did not claim work time and did not perform any work-related activities for Agriculture, thereby abusing a state resource that was assigned to him for his own personal benefit; by using his assigned state vehicle while on state time to perform activities relating to his private logging business, thereby abusing state time and resources that were assigned to him; and by attempting to use his official position as a means to avoid a citation from the Department of Forestry for logging activities being conducted by his private business over which he was fraudulently acting as the onsite Master Logger, while on state time and using his assigned state vehicle.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Begley agreed to pay a $6,500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Mark A. Jackson12-008
That a former Special Assistant with the Department of Agriculture violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by failing to file a completed 2011 Statement of Financial Disclosure within the time period required by statute for the portion of calendar year 2011 during which he was employed by the Department of Agriculture.
In a Settlement Agreement, Jackson agreed to pay a $100 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Rhonda Monroe13-08
While employed as the Assistant Executive Director of the Kentucky Registry of Election Finance, Monroe violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by using or attempting to use her knowledge of election finance laws, practices and procedures to assist her brother, who was running for a second term as the Commissioner of Agriculture, to fraudulently claim campaign-related expenses in order for him to obtain reimbursement from his campaign fund account for his personal financial gain.  Monroe did so by advising her brother and his then current spouse to claim mileage and expenses for reimbursement from his campaign account for trips that he did not actually make and for trips that were actually made by his then current spouse for her private direct sales business.  Monroe also provided her brother with receipts that she had incurred for her own personal expenses that she then guided him to submit for reimbursement from his campaign account for his own financial gain and in derogation of the state interest. 

Furthermore, Monroe used or attempted to use her knowledge of election finance laws, practices, and procedures to assist her brother, who was re-elected to his second term as the Commissioner of Agriculture, to respond to an audit being performed by her own agency.  Monroe drafted for her brother a letter, upon which her brother relied under her guidance, to respond to the Registry’s audit.  This letter drafted by Monroe was misleading in its contents and was intended to deceive the Registry about the expenses submitted for reimbursement from the campaign account, some of which included the receipts Monroe had provided to her brother for reimbursement from the campaign account that she had incurred. 
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Monroe admitted violating the Executive Branch Code of Ethics, agreed to pay a $6,000 civil penalty, agreed to cooperate with the Commission in any further investigations and proceedings, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Monroe is no longer employed by the Kentucky Registry of Election Finance.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Terry Farmer10-007
That while serving as a Transportation Engineer II for the Department of Highways, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Farmer violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by using his official position in an attempt to improperly influence the maintenance, repair, or replacement of a culvert which provides drainage to property in which he and his mother have a personal and financial interest; and by providing confidential agency documents, either directly or through his mother, to a law firm to be used in litigation against the state.  Farmer obtained the documents through his official position. 
The Final Order followed a full evidentiary hearing and the issuance of a Recommended Order by an impartial hearing officer assigned to the case.  In the Final Order, the Commission adopted the hearing officer’s Recommended Order, publicly reprimanded Farmer for his conduct in violation of KRS 11A.020(1) and 11A.040(1); and ordered him to pay a civil penalty in the amount of $10,000.  Farmer has appealedl the Final Order in Franklin Circuit Court.
Attachments: Attachment
expand Issuing Year : 2012 ‎(22)
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v.  Vicky Reynolds08-018
That the Hart County Property Valuation Administrator ("PVA") violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) by using her official position to obtain financial gain for a member of her family.  Specifically the Hart County PVA violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by using her official position as PVA to hire her mother to work for her in the Hart County PVA office, thereby giving her mother the financial gain employment provides
In a Settlement Agreement, the Hart County PVA agreed to pay a $2,000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. (REDACTED 08-017)08-017
That the (REDACTED) County Property Valuation Administrator ("PVA") violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) by using her official position or office to obtain financial gain for a member of her family.  Specifically the (REDACTED) County PVA violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by using her official position as PVA to promote her son to a higher paid position within the (REDACTED) County PVA office, thereby giving her son the financial gain that came with this advancement.
The Final Order followed a full evidentiary hearing and the issuance of a Recommended Order by an impartial hearing officer assigned to the case.  In the Final Order, the Commission adopted the hearing officer's Recommended Order, ordering (REDACTED) to cease and desist any further violation of KRS 11A.020(1)(c) in hiring or promotion actions and pay no penalty.  (REDACTED) has appealed the Final Order in Franklin Circuit Court.  The Franklin Circuit Court reversed the Final Order of the Commission.  The Court of Appeals affirmed the Franklin Circuit Court Order.  The Supreme Court denied discretionary review.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. (REDACTED 08-019)08-019
That while serving as the Property Valuation Administrator of (REDACTED) County, (REDACTED)violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) by using her official position or office to obtain financial gain for a member of her family.  Specifically, (REDACTED), who still serves as the (REDACTED) County PVA, violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by using her official position as PVA to hire her daughter to work for her in the (REDACTED) County PVA office, thereby giving her daughter the financial gain employment provides.
The Final Order followed a full evidentiary hearing and the issuance of a Recommended Order by an impartial hearing officer assigned to the case.  In the Final Order, the Commission adopted the hearing officer's Recommended Order, ordering (REDACTED) to henceforth obey KRS 11A.020(1)(c) in hiring or promotion actions; to post a copy of KRS 11A.020 prominently in a public place in her office as a reminder of the law; and to pay a civil penalty in the amount of $2000.  (REDACTED) has appealed the Final Order in Franklin Circuit Court.  The Franklin Circuit Court reversed the Final Order of the Commission.  The Court of Appeals affirmed the Franklin Circuit Court Order.  The Supreme Court denied discretionary review.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. (REDACTED 08-020)08-020
That (REDACTED), (REDACTED) County Property Valuation Administrator violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) by using his official position or office to obtain financial gain for a member of his family.  Specifically, (REDACTED), who still serves as (REDACTED) County PVA, violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by hiring his daughter on several occasions to work for him in the (REDACTED)County PVA office, thereby giving his daughter the financial gain employment provides.
In a Final Order issued by the Commission, (REDACTED), while serving as the Property Valuation Administrator of (REDACTED) County, was found to have violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) by using his official position or office to obtain financial gain for a member of his family.  The Final Order followed a full evidentiary hearing and the issuance of a Recommended Order by an impartial hearing officer assigned to the case. In the Final Order the Commission adopted the hearing officer's Recommended Order, ordering (REDACTED) to henceforth obey KRS 11A.020(1)(c) in hiring or promotion actions; to post a copy of KRS 11A.020 prominently in a public place in his office; and to pay a civil penalty in the amount of $4,000.  (REDACTED) has appealed the Final Order in Franklin Circuit Court.  The Franklin Circuit Court reversed the Final Order of the Commission.  The Court of Appeals affirmed the Franklin Circuit Court Order.  The Supreme Court denied discretionary review.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. (REDACTED 08-021)08-021
That (REDACTED), while serving as the PROPERTY VALUATION ADMINISTRATOR of (REDACTED) County, was found to have violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) by using his official position or office to obtain financial gain for a member of his family.  Specifically (REDACTED), who still serves as the (REDACTED) County PVA, violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by using his official position as PVA to hire his wife to work for him in the (REDACTED) County PVA office, ultimately promoting her to be his Chief Deputy, thereby giving his wife the financial gain employment provides
In a Final Order issued by the Commission, (REDACTED), was found to have violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c). The Final Order followed a full evidentiary hearing and the issuance of a Recommended Order by an impartial hearing officer assigned to the case.  In the Final Order, the Commission adopted the hearing officer’s Recommended Order, ordering (REDACTED) to henceforth obey KRS 11A.020(1)(c) in hiring or promotion actions; to post a copy of KRS 11A.020 prominently in a public place in his office as a reminder of the law; and to pay a civil penalty in the amount of $5000.  (REDACTED) has appealed the Final Order in Franklin Circuit Court.  The Franklin Circuit Court reversed the Final Order of the Commission.  The Court of Appeals affirmed the Franklin Circuit Court Order.  The Supreme Court denied discretionary review.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. (REDACTED 08-023)08-023
That while serving as the Property Valuation Administrator of (REDACTED) County Shields violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) by using her official position or office to obtain financial gain for a member of her family.  Specifically, (REDACTED), who still serves as the (REDACTED) County PVA, violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by using her position as PVA to hire her husband to work for her in the (REDACTED) County PVA office as her Chief Deputy, thereby giving her husband the financial gain employment provides.
The Final Order followed a full evidentiary hearing and the issuance of a Recommended Order by an impartial hearing officer assigned to the case.  In the Final Order, the Commission adopted the hearing officer’s Recommended Order, ordering (REDACTED) to henceforth obey KRS 11A.020(1)(c) in hiring or promotion actions; to post a copy of KRS 11A.020 prominently in a public place in her office as a reminder of the law; and to pay a civil penalty in the amount of $4000.  (REDACTED)has appealed the Final Order in Franklin Circuit Court.  The Franklin Circuit Court reversed the Final Order of the Commission.  The Court of Appeals affirmed the Franklin Circuit Court Order.  The Supreme Court denied discretionary review.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Betty Atkinson08-022
That the Powell County Property Valuation Administrator ("PVA") violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) by using her official position or office to obtain financial gain for a member of her family.  Specifically Atkinson, who no longer serves as the Powell County PVA, violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by using her official position as PVA to hire her daughter to work for her in the Powell County PVA office, ultimately promoting her to be her Chief Deputy, thereby giving her daughter the financial gain employment provides.
In a Final Order issued by the Ethics Commission, Atkinson, was found to have violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c).   The Final Order followed a full evidentiary hearing and the issuance of a Recommended Order by an impartial hearing officer assigned to the case.  In the Final Order, the Commission adopted the hearing officer’s Recommended Order, ordering Atkinson to pay a civil penalty in the amount of $2000.  Atkinson is no longer employed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Billie Johnson12-001
That the Assistant Director with the Division of Highway Safety Programs, Department of Transportation, violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) and KRS 11A.045 by using her official position to obtain financial gain for others; to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for others in derogation of the public interest at large; and by knowingly accepting gifts totaling a value greater than twenty-five dollars ($25) in a single calendar year from an entity that does business with the agency in which the public servant is employed.  Specifically, during June of 2009, Johnson acquired and gave credentials to six friends, acquaintances, and family members to a race that the Dvision of Highway  Safety Programs was sponsoring at the Kentucky Motor Speedway held on July 18, 2009.  The credentials were received during the course of her employment and gave her friends and family members access to areas of the Kentucky Motor Speedway to which the general public could not gain access.  Neither Johnson nor her friends and family members paid any amount for the credentials.  The actual cost of a general admission ticket to the race was $20 per ticket but the credentials have no face value because the general public does not have access to or the opportunity to buy the credentials, therefore the value is indeterminate.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission,  the employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) and KRS 11A.045 as alleged, agreed to pay a $750 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Boyd Sigler12-002
That the Director of the Division of Highway Safety Programs, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) and KRS 11A.045 by using his official position to obtain financial gain for himself and members of his family; to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself or others in derogation of the public interest at large; and by knowingly accepting gifts totaling a value greater than twenty-five dollars ($25) in a single calendar year from an entity that does business with the agency in which the public servant is employed.  Specifically, Sigler violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by using his official position to gain access for himself and a family member to sections of the Kentucky Motor Speedway that were not accessible by the public so that he and his family member could meet with a well-known singer and actress. Sigler received information from officials of the time and date of the celebrity’s appearance; when he arrived at the designated time, he was given a ride on a golf cart to non-public areas of the Speedway; he was allowed access to a suite over looking the race in which to await the celebrity; and he was given private access to the celebrity to gain her signature for his family member.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission,  the employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) and KRS 11A.045 as alleged, agreed to pay a $400 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Sigler is no longer employed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Bradford S. Bailey08-013
That a Property Valuation Administrator ("PVA") in Barren County violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) by using his official position or office to obtain financial gain for a member of his family.  Specifically, the Barren County PVA, Brad Bailey,  violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by using his official position as PVA to hire his daughter to work for him in the Barren County PVA office, thereby giving his daughter the financial gain employment provides
In a Settlement Agreement, the Barren County PVA agreed to pay a $2,000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Bradley Lowe11-012
That an employee with the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a) and (d) by using or attempting to use his influence in matters that involved a substantial conflict between his personal or private interest and his duties in the public interest and by using his official position to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for others in derogation of the public interest at large.  Specifically, Lowe used his official position as a conservation officer by brandishing his conservation officer badge and using his status as a law enforcement officer to falsely claim that he was involved in an official undercover investigation to secure entry for his fifteen year old daughter into an Alcoholic Beverage Control regulated establishment for patrons 21 years of age and older.  He continued to brandish his badge to order drinks for his daughter while in the Lexington establishment. 
In a Settlement Agreement the employee admitted violating KRS 11A.020(1)(a) and (d) as alleged, agreed to pay a $2,500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Dallas E. Kelly12-004
That while employed as an Environmental Inspector III, Division of Mine Reclamation and Enforcement, Department of Natural Resources Kelly violated KRS 11A.020(1)(b), (c), and (d) by using or attempting to use any means to influence a public agency in derogation of the state at large, using his official position to obtain financial gain for himself or any members of his family, and using or attempting to use his position to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself or others in derogation of the public interest at large.

Specifically Kelly falsified timesheets, vehicle logs, and mine reports, claiming to have performed inspections that he had not performed; completed a mine report with inaccuracies that influenced his public agency in derogation of the state; and failed to fulfill his job duties while receiving compensation. 
In a Settlement Agreement, Kelly admitted that his conduct violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics, agreed to pay a $500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by means of an Agreed Final Order.  Kelly is no longer employed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Danita Fentress-Laird11-011
That an employee in the Department of Agriculture, Office of Strategic Planning and Administration violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d), (2), and (3) by using her official position to give herself a financial gain and an advantage in derogation of the public interest at large; using her official position to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for herself in derogation of the public interest; failing to avoid all conduct which might in any way lead members of the general public to conclude that she was using her official position to further her professional or private interest; and failing to abstain from action on an official decision in which she had a personal or private interest and failing to notify her superior in writing of her reasons for abstaining so that her superior could have an impartial third party make the decision.  Specifically, Fentress-Laird used her position to influence her superiors to allow her to create an assistant director classified, merit position within her own division, then took the following actions to ensure she was placed in the position herself: contacted the Department of Personnel to establish the new position and drafted the position description and job duties; applied as a candidate for the position after assigning her subordinate with the job of conducting the interviews; and created the interview questions and possible acceptable answers for her subordinate to use during the interview process.  When her subordinate reported to Fentress-Laird her recommendation for the best candidate for the position, which was in fact Fentress-Laird, Fentress-Laird reported that recommendation to the Commissioner of Agriculture and directed her subordinate to establish through the Personnel Cabinet the pay grade for her new position as assistant director. 
In a Settlement Agreement the employee admitted violating KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d), (2), and (3) as alleged, agreed to pay a $1,500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Dennis Sharon12-003
That a Conservation Officer with the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources violated  KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (b), (c) and (d),  KRS 11A.020(2), KRS 11A.020(3), and KRS 11A.040(1)  by using his influence in a matter that involved a substantial conflict between his personal or private interest and his duties in the public interest; influencing a public agency in derogation of the state at large; using his official position to give himself a financial gain and an advantage in derogation of the public interest at large; using his official position to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself in derogation of the public interest; failing to avoid all conduct which might in any way lead members of the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his professional or private interest, failing to abstain from an official decision in which he had or may have had a personal or private interest, and knowingly using confidential information acquired in the course of his official duties in order to further his own economic interests.

Specifically, in April of 2007, Sharon participated in the multi-state law enforcement operation called “Skid Roe” concerning the commercial fishing of paddlefish in restricted waters, during which Sharon was assigned the task of serving a warrant.  On or about April 23, 2007, Sharon served a warrant on the Albert Collins residence and seized cash and property related to Mr. Collins’ commercial paddlefish fishing operation.   On or about October 15, 2008, Sharon received a Resident Roe Bearing Harvester’s Permit and Resident Commercial Fishing License from the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.  As documented on his Daily Roe Bearing Fish Harvester’s Transaction Report, from approximately November 10, 2008, through February 22, 2010, Sharon reported participating in commercial fishing activities in which he sold approximately 464 pounds of paddlefish roe to Albert Collins.

In January of 2008, Sharon met with Steve Kinder, a commercial fisherman, at the boat ramp in Carrolton, Kentucky, at the confluence of the Kentucky River and the Ohio River.  Kinder and Sharon discussed Kinder’s desire to fish the area during the following fishing season.  Kinder asked Sharon to provide him with the exact measurements of the restricted area, pursuant to 301 KAR 1:155, Section 3(2)(b).   On or about April 25, 2008, at the confluence of the Kentucky and Ohio rivers, Kinder observed two commercial fishermen already in the spot.  The fishermen told Kinder that Dennis Sharon directed them to fish in the area in question.  In November of 2008, at the start of the commercial fishing season, Kinder discovered Sharon conducting commercial fishing activities in the same location in which Kinder told Sharon he was planning to begin fishing.  Sharon used information gained during his official duties while speaking with Steve Kinder in confidence about the benefits of commercial fishing in waters at the confluence of the Kentucky and Ohio Rivers to benefit other fishermen and himself to further his own economic interests.

On or about April 13 and November 18 of 2009 and January 14, March 5, April 1, 2, 5, 6 and 7 of 2010, Dennis Sharon and his designated helper Kenneth Burns were observed conducting commercial fishing activities on the Ohio River within 50 yards of the mouth of the Kentucky River, in violation of 301 KAR 1:155, Section 3(2)(b), despite attesting on his Resident Roe Bearing Harvester’s Permit applications that the requirements of 301 KAR 1:155 are binding upon him and anyone he designated as a helper.  By attesting on his application before the Department that he would follow 301 KAR 1:155 and failing to follow or enforce the requirements of that regulation, Sharon failed to avoid conduct which might in any way lead members of the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his professional or private interest.  Such activities provided Sharon with the financial gain and benefit of fishing a restricted area that was not otherwise accessible by other commercial fishermen.  Further, Sharon used his influence as a conservation officer to protect the activities of his designated helper, Kenneth Burns, allowing Burns the benefit and financial gain of fishing in waters that were otherwise restricted from other commercial fishermen. Sharon conducted these illegal activities despite his requirement as a law enforcement officer to uphold the law and his requirement as a conservation officer to enforce fish and wildlife laws and regulations.   Sharon was able to conduct these illegal activities in a prolonged and open manner because he was known in the community as a law enforcement officer and used his influence as a conservation officer over the community and his Department to protect his activities as a commercial fisherman in restricted waters, which was a matter that involved a substantial conflict between his personal or private interest and his duties in the public interest. 

On or about March 5, 2010, conservation officers from the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (“DNR”) seized gill nets found in restricted waters at the confluence of the Kentucky and Ohio rivers in Carrollton, Kentucky, equipped with expired 2009 commercial fishing tags belonging to Dennis Sharon.  That same day, at a meeting in Boone County, Kentucky, Indiana DNR Conservation Officers Lt. Tony Stoll and Maj. Felix Hensley confronted Dennis Sharon in front of his commanding officers, Sgt. Greg Davis and Capt. Bobby Newman.   Sharon proceeded to inform the officers that he had obtained a valid 2010 Commercial Fishing License, but refused to show it to the officers.   Sharon did not apply for a 2010 Commercial Fishing license until March 8, 2010.  Further, when asked by the officers whether he had any other nets set in the waters of the Ohio River in addition to the nets the officers seized at the mouth of the Kentucky River, Sharon answered in the negative.  However, Indiana DNR officers later seized a net with expired 2009 commercial fishing tags that belonged to Dennis Sharon within fifty (50) yards of the mouth of the Little Kentucky River.   Sharon was charged criminally for these offenses in Switzerland County, Indiana on March 2, 2012. Furthermore, Sharon reported on his Monthly Report of Commercial Fish Harvest in Kentucky for the month of March 2010 that he did not have commercial gill nets in any waters in Kentucky from March 1st through the 27th.  However, the Indiana Officers seized gill nets belonging to Sharon placed in the Kentucky and Little Kentucky Rivers on March 5, 2010. Sharon failed to avoid conduct which might in any way lead members of the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his professional or private interest when he lied to the Indiana and Kentucky officers about having a valid commercial license and more nets in the water.  Such activities were also an attempt by Sharon to use his influence on the Kentucky and Indiana officers to protect his financial gain and benefit from fishing a restricted area that was not otherwise accessible by other commercial fishermen, which was a matter that involved a substantial conflict between his personal or private interest and his duties in the public interest. 

On or about April 6, 2010, Dennis Sharon was informed by his commanding officer, Sgt. Greg Davis, of the measurement of the restricted areas around the confluence of the Kentucky and Ohio Rivers and was provided a map including the coordinates of the restricted fishing areas.   Later that day, Sharon was observed measuring and moving his commercial fishing nets, leaving his nets within the restricted zone. Again on or about April 7, 2010, Sharon was observed measuring and moving his commercial fishing nets, leaving his nets in restricted waters. This conduct shows how Sharon failed to avoid conduct which might in any way lead members of the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his professional or private interest.  Such activities were also an attempt by Sharon to use his influence as a Kentucky conservation officer to protect his financial gain and benefit from fishing a restricted area that was not otherwise accessible by other commercial fishermen, which was a matter that involved a substantial conflict between his personal or private interest and his duties in the public interest. 

On or about April 7, 2010, conservation officers from the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (“DNR”) stopped Dennis Sharon for commercially fishing in restricted waters and seized gill nets as well as over 12 lbs of paddlefish roe found in restricted waters at the confluence of the Kentucky and Ohio Rivers in Carrollton, Kentucky.  During this encounter, Indiana DNR Conservation Officers Sgt. John Cannarella, Corp. Steve Kinne, and Corey Norrod confronted Dennis Sharon about his commercial fishing in restricted waters.   Sharon proceeded to inform the officers that he had been given permission by his commanding officers to fish in the restricted area and that he would have his agency defend him in court.   Sharon was charged criminally for this conduct in Switzerland County, Indiana on March 2, 2012.  Sharon failed to avoid conduct which might in any way lead members of the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his professional or private interest.  Such activities were also an attempt by Sharon to use his influence on Indiana officers to protect his financial gain and benefit from fishing a restricted area that was not otherwise accessible by other commercial fishermen, which was a matter that involved a substantial conflict between his personal or private interest and his duties in the public interest. 

On or about March 22, 2011, Dennis Sharon, without permission or the knowledge of his supervisors, while in uniform and driving his commissioned vehicle, left his assigned county of Gallatin in District 5 and travelled to Oldham County in District 3, to meet with Oldham County Attorney, John Carter, to influence the prosecution of David Cottrell, a commercial fisherman.  On March 22, 2011, Sharon was working on state time and claimed 7.5 of regular hours on his official timesheet.  Based on a citation brought by Indiana DNR Officers Steve Kinne and Corey Norrod, David Cottrell was charged with failure to maintain the required number of commercial fishing tags on his gill nets placed in the Ohio River.  David Cottrell and Sharon both sell fish roe to Jessica Schigur, the Fish Roe Buyer whom Dennis Sharon has sold fish roe to from approximately November 20, 2010, to the present.  Sharon told Mr. Carter that the offenses for which Mr. Cottrell had been charged were not offenses that the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources was interested in prosecuting.  By attempting to influence the prosecution of David Cottrell, Sharon failed to avoid conduct which might in any way lead members of the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his professional or private interest in commercial fishing by helping out another commercial fisherman related to his fish roe buyer.  Such activities were also an attempt by Sharon to represent the interests of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources in a way that would also protect his and other commercial fishermen’s financial gain and benefit him by influencing the enforcement of commercial fishing laws and regulations to suit his private interests.   Finally, Sharon was attempting to influence a matter that involved the same Indiana DNR officers who charged him with commercial fishing law violations, which is a substantial conflict between his personal or private interest and his duties in the public interest. 

On or about April 17, 2011, Dennis Sharon told Barrett Brewer, the conservation officer assigned to Oldham County, to not get involved with the prosecution of David Cottrell in Oldham County for the commercial fishing violation from March 2011.  Sharon told Officer Brewer that that he, Dennis Sharon, was handling the matter and that Officer Brewer need not get involved.  Sharon told Brewer that the case against David Cottrell should not be prosecuted.
By attempting to influence Officer Brewer to not get involved with the prosecution of David Cottrell, Sharon failed to avoid conduct which might in any way lead members of the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his professional or private interest in commercial fishing by helping out another commercial fisherman related to his fish roe buyer.  Such activities were also an attempt by Sharon to influence Officer Brewer and the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources in a way that would also protect his and another commercial fisherman’s financial gain and benefit him by influencing the enforcement of commercial fishing laws and regulations to suit his private interests.   Finally, Sharon was attempting to influence a matter that involved the same Indiana DNR officers who charged him with commercial fishing law violations, which is a substantial conflict between his personal or private interest and his duties in the public interest. 

On or about October 21, 2008, Sharon applied for a commercial fishing license and Roe Bearing Harvesters Permit with the Department.  Sharon’s supervisors instructed him that he was not to participate in official duties or enforcement activities in the counties in which he conducted commercial fishing and to avoid commercial fishing activities in his assigned county of Gallatin County, which was consistent with the Department’s policy.  From November 2008 through April 2010, Sharon was observed on multiple occasions by the public and law enforcement officers participating in commercial fishing activities in Carroll County, Kentucky.  From October 2008 through present, Sharon has issued approximately 24 citations in Carroll County, Kentucky, approximately 7 of which involve fishing related violations.  By participating in commercial fishing activities in Carroll County and issuing citations in Carroll County, Sharon failed to avoid conduct which might in any way lead members of the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his professional or private interest and failed to abstain from an official decision in which he had or may have had a personal or private interest. 

On or about April 2, 2011, while in uniform and in his commissioned vehicle, Sharon confronted two commercial fishermen at Point Park in Carrolton, Kentucky, for placing nets too closely to his commercial fishing nets located at the confluence of the Kentucky and Ohio Rivers and threatened to write them citations for the conduct and confiscate their nets so that they could not fish in the location any longer. 

In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Sharon agreed to pay a $10,000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Sharon is no longer employed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Margaret "Geri" Murphy12-006
That a Social Service Clerk I in the Department for Community Based Services violated KRS 11A.020(1)(b)and (d) by using or attempting to use any means to influence a public agency in derogation of the state at large and using her official position to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for herself in derogation of the public interest at large.  Specifically, from April 2006 - October 2010, Murphy falsified reports claiming to have performed investigations into the abuse and neglect of children that she had not performed, completed reports with inaccuracies that influenced her public agency and other law enforcement agencies in derogation of the state, and failed to fulfill her job duties while receiving wages and benefits.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Murphy admitted to violating KRS 11A.020(1)(b) and (d), agreed to pay a $1750 civil penalty after she is released from prison, agreed to never again seek employment in any position within any branch of the government of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing an Agreed Final Order.  Additionally, for this same conduct, Murphy was charged in Anderson Criminal Court with nine counts of Tampering with Public Records, pled guilty to all counts and was sentened to five years in prison.  She remains incarcerated.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Michael Cooper12-005
That while employed as the Commissioner of the Department of Tourism, in the Tourism, Arts, and Heritage Cabinet, Cooper violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using his official position or office to obtain financial gain for himself or members of his family and to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself or others in derogation of the public interest at large.  Specifically Cooper travelled to London, England, without notice to or prior approval of his agency, and participated in events organized by GOSH PR, an entity with which his Cabinet maintained an ongoing contract.  During his London visit, GOSH PR paid for meals, taxi cabs and other activities for Cooper.  After he returned from the trip, Cooper informed his agency that the trip to London was for personal reasons; however, he later approved an invoice submitted by GOSH PR for reimbursement by his agency of the expenses incurred by GOSH PR on Cooper’s behalf. 

In addition, during Cooper’s tenure as Commissioner, he generally failed to follow personnel rules for reporting travel expenses, charged personal items to a state-issued credit card without informing his agency, conducted personal business while on approved state travel, booked more expensive flights in order to combine business and pleasure travel, and showed an overall failure to keep the documentation necessary for reimbursement for business travel. 
In the Settlement Agreement, Cooper admitted that his conduct violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics, agreed to pay a $2000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Cooper is no longer employed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Michael Fitzgerald12-006*
That an Agriculture Marketing Supervisor over the Organic Program with the Department of Agriculture violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (b), (c) and (d) and KRS 11A.020(2) by using his influence in a matter that involved a substantial conflict between his personal or private interest and his duties in the public interest; influencing a public agency in derogation of the state at large; using his official position to give himself a financial gain and an advantage in derogation of the public interest at large; using his official position to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself in derogation of the public interest, and failing to avoid all conduct which might in any way lead members of the general public to conclude that he was using his official position to further his professional or private interest.

Specifically, during January, February and March 2012, Fitzgerald used his state-issued email account and Department letterhead to endorse a private company to provide organic certification inspections and services to out-of-state organic product producers for which the Department chose to no longer provide such services on January 17, 2012.  Fitzgerald used this private company to certify his private organic farm located in Henry County, Kentucky.  Fitzgerald also used his endorsement of this private company to support his solicitation of said producers for his business of conducting private inspections and to generate business for the private company for which he sought to serve as an independent contractor.  During 2010, 2011, and 2012, Fitzgerald, during time he was working for the Department, used his state-issued email account and state-issued cell phone to solicit and to arrange dates and times that he would perform inspections for out-of-state organic product producers.  During 2010 through 2011, Fitzgerald, performed inspections at the locations of out-of-state organic product producers, which was outside of his regular job duties, while collecting a private fee, while often times on state time and driving a state vehicle.  During 2010 through 2011, Fitzgerald used a state vehicle for no apparent work-related reason.  Fitzgerald cited on the vehicle sign out logs that he was taking a state vehicle to perform “inspections,” but performed no corresponding inspections either for out-of-state or in-state organic product producers and did not create any corresponding inspection records indicating that he had conducted such inspections during that year.  Fitzgerald also cited using the state vehicle to perform specific in-state inspections that were never actually performed and no record was generated to indicate an inspection was ever conducted.  During 2010 and 2011, Fitzgerald performed private inspections for out-of-state organic product producers who had also requested to be certified by the Organic Program for which he was responsible, but Fitzgerald failed to ensure that these same producers’ applications received the appropriate first review, final review or certificate, which was part of his job duties with the Department.  During 2010 and 2011, Fitzgerald conducted the first review, final review, and signed the certificate for organic product producers despite having the responsibility as supervisor of the Organic Program to ensure that at least two individuals performed such functions as required by the federal rules applicable to the organic certification.  Fitzgerald also performed the private inspections for these producers and accepted fees for performing the inspections. During 2010 and 2011, Fitzgerald submitted inspection reports to the Organic Program for private inspections that he claimed to have performed and had garnered a fee for performing for out-of-state organic product producers that he had not actually performed, could not have physically completed in the time allotted, or for which he performed insufficient and incomplete inspection reports.  Fitzgerald’s deficient inspection reports for the out-of-state producers influenced his Department to issue certificates to producers that might not have otherwise received certification had proper inspections been completed in derogation of the public interest.  During 2010 and 2011, Fitzgerald either forged or ensured the forgery of the signature of his supervisor on certificates that were issued to out-of-state organic product producers certified by the Organic Program, for which he maintained responsibility, in matters in which he had also performed the private inspections for a fee. In 2011, Fitzgerald sold hay from his personal organic farm to an organic product producer certified under the Department’s Organic Program, for which he maintained responsibility, and to which he had issued a Notice of Noncompliance a few months prior.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission Fitzgerald admitted violating KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (b), (c) and (d) and KRS 11A.020(2), agreed to pay a $10,000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Fitzgerald is no longer employed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Philip Mobley08-014
That the Clay County Property Valuation Administrator ("PVA") violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) by using his official position or office to obtain financial gain for a member of her family.  Specifically the Clay County PVA violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by using his official position as PVA to hire his wife to work for him in the Clay County PVA office, thereby giving his wife the financial gain employment provides
The Final Order followed a full evidentiary hearing and the issuance of a Recommended Order by an impartial hearing officer assigned to the case.  In the Final Order, the Commission adopted the hearing officer's Recommended Order, ordering Mobley to cease and desist any further violation of KRS 11A.020(1)(c) such as granting his wife any discretionary promotions or pay increases; to post a copy of KRS 11A.020 prominently in a public place in his office as a reminder of the law; and to pay a civil penalty of $2,000. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Renee True08-015
That the former Fayette County Property Valuation Administrator ("PVA") violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) by using her official position or office to obtain financial gain for a member of her family.  Specifically the former Fayette County PVA violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by using her former position as PVA to hire her mother to work for her in the Fayette County PVA office, thereby giving her mother the financial gain employment provides.
In a Settlement Agreement, the former Fayette County PVA agreed to pay a $2,000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Robert Habig11-010
That an employee with the Department of Parks, Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d), as well as KRS 11A.045(1) by using his official position to obtain financial gain for others, to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for others in derogation of the public interest at large, and by accepting gifts totaling a value greater than $25 in a single calendar year from a person or business that does business with or attempting to influence the actions of the agency in which he is employed or which he supervises.  Specifically Habig, the business manager at Lake Cumberland State Resort Park, along with his family, used a pontoon boat and a ski boat owned by State Dock Marina Ventures, LLC (“State Dock”) without paying a rental fee.  State Dock has a lease agreement with the Department of Parks to lease the Lake Cumberland marina.  The actual rental rate for the pontoon boat from State Dock is approximately $119 to $299, depending on the season, the size of the pontoon boat, and the length of the rental time; the rental fee for a ski boat from State Dock is approximately $329 to $529 depending on the size of the boat and the season.  
In a Settlement Agreement the employee admitted violating KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d), as well as KRS 11A.045(1) as alleged, agreed to pay a $500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Roger Tomes08-016
That a Property Valuation Administrator  (PVA) of Grayson County violated KRS11A.020(1)(c) by using his official position or office to obtain financial gain for a member of his family; specifically using his official position to hire his son to work for him in the Grayson County PVA office, thereby giving his son the financial gain employment provides.
In a Settlement Agreement, the PVA admitted to violating KRS11A.020(1)(c) as alleged, agreed to pay a $1,000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Schyler Olt12-007
That the former General Counsel with the Kentucky Retirement Systems violated KRS 11A.050(1), (2), and (3) by failing to properly file the Statement of Financial Disclosure with the Executive Branch Ethics Commission.  Specifically, Olt, as an "officer" as defined in KRS 11A.010(7), failed to file a completed 2011 Statement of Financial Disclosure within the time period required by statute for the portion of calendar year 2011 during which he was employed by the Kentucky Retirement Systems as a General Counsel.
In a Settlement Agreement approved by the Commission, Olt admitted to violating 11A.050(1), (2), and (3), agreed to pay a $100 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and wavied any right to appeal.  The Commission concluded the matter by issuing a Final Order.  Olt also filed the required Statement of Financial Disclosure.
Attachments: Attachment
expand Issuing Year : 2011 ‎(12)
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Charles Geveden, Jr.11-004
That during his course of employment as Executive Director of the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety in the Department of Highways, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Charles Geveden, Jr.:

1) Violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a) and (d) and KRS 11A.045(1) by using his influence in a matter involving a substantial conflict between his personal or private interest and his duties in the public interest; and using his official position to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself in derogation of the public interest at large.  Specifically, Geveden improperly used his official position to obtain pit passes and parking passes for himself and other individuals to three NASCAR races at Bristol Motor Speedway in 2010 by soliciting them through an official of the Kentucky Speedway, an entity doing business with the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety. 

2) Violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using his official position to obtain financial gain for himself; and to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself in derogation of the public interest at large by causing his agency to pay for lodging for himself and others for a personal trip to attend a NASCAR race at Bristol, Tennessee.  Specifically, on March 20, 2010, the night before the NASCAR race at Bristol, Tennessee, Geveden and three personal guests stayed in a two bedroom cottage at Pine Mountain State Park.  The next morning, prior to traveling on to Bristol for the NASCAR race, Geveden did stop at the Cumberland Gap Tunnel Operations Center for a brief prearranged official visit.  However, at the time Geveden reserved the cottage at Pine Mountain State Resort Park, there was no apparent business purpose for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet to pay for the lodging and, further, Geveden did not report any work time for March 20, 2010 through March 21, 2010.

In a Settlement Agreement, the employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (c) and (d), and KRS 11A.045(1), as alleged, agreed to pay a $4,000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Joby L. Gossett10-003
That during the course of his employment as a conservation officer with the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Joby L. Gossett:  1) Violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a) and (d) by using or attempting to use his influence and official position to obtain three sets of antlers (caribou, red stag, and fallow deer) from private citizens for the personal benefit of himself or his wife.  His actions in this matter involved a substantial conflict between his personal or private interest in the antlers and his duties in the public interest relating thereto, and were in derogation of the public interest at large.  2) Violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a) and (d) by using his influence and official position to attempt to pressure a private citizen in regard to a 34 point deer rack the individual had found, first by trying to obtain the rack directly from the private citizen for himself, then by trying to convince the private citizen to take the rack to a specific taxidermist, a business regulated by the agency for which Gossett worked.  Gossett’s actions in this matter involved a substantial conflict between his personal or private interest in the rack and his duties in the public interest relating thereto, and his endorsement of the taxidermist in question was an attempt to secure or create an advantage for himself or that regulated business in derogation of the public interest at large.
In a Settlement Agreement, Gossett admitted that he violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a) and (d), as alleged, agreed to pay a $1,250 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Kelly Noble, Jr.09-002
That during the course of his employment with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Department of Highways, District 10, Kelly Noble, Jr., violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using his official position to obtain financial gain for himself; and to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself and others in derogation of the public interest at large by falsifying timesheets for the benefit of himself and others; utilizing his assigned Kentucky Transportation Cabinet cell phone to conduct personal business as well as Breathitt School Board Business; and utilizing a Kentucky Transportation Cabinet vehicle to conduct personal and Breathitt County School Board business.
In a Settlement Agreement, Noble admitted that he violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d), as alleged, agreed to pay a $1,250 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Matthew Finley11-02
That an employee of the Public Protection Cabinet, Office of Legal Services, violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using his official position to give himself a financial gain; and to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself in derogation of the public interest at large by earning money as an online legal expert while on state time; and by using his official position to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself in derogation of the public interest at large by using a state resources to benefit himself in derogation of the public interest at large.
In a Settlement Agreement, the employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) as alleged, agreed to pay a $2,000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Natalie Jensen11-003
That during the course of her employment with the Kentucky Department for Energy Development and Independence Natalie Jensen violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c)and (d) by using her official position to obtain financial gain for herself and to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for herself in derogation of the public interest at large by misappropriating public funds by means of executing, for her personal benefit, three checks totaling $2,250.00 on the account of the Governor’s Conference on the Environment, a bank account entrusted to her in her official position.  In cashing these checks for her personal gain, Jensen also violated KRS 11A.040(2) by knowingly receiving interest or profit arising from the use or loan of public funds in her hands.
In a Settlement Agreement, Jensen admitted that she violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) and KRS 11A.040(2) as alleged, but that she did so by executing and cashing only one such check for her personal benefit, in the amount of $1000.00.  In the Settlement Agreement, Jensen also agreed to pay a $1,500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Tim Hibbard11-006
That during his course of employment with the Department of Parks in the Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet, Timothy Hibbard violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using his official position to obtain financial gain for others and to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for others in derogation of the public interest at large.  Specifically, Hibbard provided exceptionally discounted rates to General Butler State Resort Park Lodge to his family members and friends on five separate occasions during 2009 and 2010 that resulted in total lost revenue for the Lodge of $698.55.  Such discounted rates were not allowed by any existing policies of the Lodge, the Department of Parks, or the Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet.
In a Settlement Agreement, Hibbard admitted that he violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) as alleged, agreed to pay a $1,000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission vs. Eddie Moore11-009
That during the course of his employment as a Resort Park Manager, III  Lake Cumberland State Resort Park with the Department of Parks, Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet, Moore violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) as well as KRS 11A.045(1) by using his official position to obtain financial gain for himself and others in derogation of the public interest at large, and by accepting gifts totaling a value greater than twenty-five dollars ($25) in a single calendar year from a person or business that does business with or is attempting to influence the actions of the agency in which he is employed or which he supervises.  Specifically Moore rented a 7 bedroom houseboat on two occasions for the use of himself and his family and friends for a substantially reduced rate from a private  company holding the lease agreement with the Department of Parks to lease the Lake Cumberlland Marina.  Further on at least three occasions, Moore, along with his family, used a ski boat owned by the same private company without paying a rental fee.
In a Settlement Agreement, Moore admitted he violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) as well as KRS 11A.045(1) and agreed to pay a $1,500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission vs. George "Chris" Juilfs11-005
That during his course of employment as an Environmental Inspector III with the Division for Air Quality, Department for Environmental Protection, Energy and Environment Cabinet,  Juilfs violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by grossly misusing state equipment for his own personal interest and the interest of others.  Specifically, he used his state vehicle to transport individuals who were not state employees, used his state vehicle for his own personal reasons, and allowed an individual who was not a state employee to use his state-issued cellphone on multiple occasions.
In a Settlement Agreement the employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d), agreed to pay a $1,000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission vs. John T. "Tom" Boone11-008
That during the course of his employment as a Plumbing Inspector Reviewer with  the Division of Plumbing, Department of Housing, Buildings and Construction, Public Protection Cabinet, Boone violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using his official position to obtain free classroom space on at least 35 separate days for the purpose of teaching plumbing code classes in his private capacity, used copies of materials developed by his Division as course materials for teaching the Kentucky State Plumbing Code in his private capacity, and used his official position to obtain the free use of a copier to make copies of the course materials obtained from his Division for students in his private class.  He further violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by teaching plumbing code courses on multiple occasions despite being told by his supervisor that employees of his Division were not to teach plumbing code classes on their own because all plumbing code classes were to be taught by the Division through a participating college.  After  suggesting that students attending his privately-provided classes make a $350 to $375 “donation” per student to him, the employee collected approximately $13,000 in “donations” for teaching his plumbing code classes between December 15, 2008 and October 15, 2010.  The employee also violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a) by conducting a plumbing inspection in his official capacity for a company from which he had received $3,850 in “donations” for conducting plumbing code classes in his private capacity for its employees.  The employee also conducted plumbing inspections in his official capacity for another company whose employees had paid him for conducting plumbing code classes in his private capacity.
In a Settlement Agreement the employee admitted violating KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (c), and (d), agreed to pay a $5000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission vs. Moses Young10-006
That during his course of employment with the Office of Inspector General, Division of Health Care Facilities and Services, Cabinet for Health and Family Services, Moses Young violated KRS 11A.045(1), which restricts a public servant from receiving anything over $25 in value from a person or business regulated by his own agency, by living rent free in a residence owned by a corporation regulated by his agency.  He obtained this financial gain for himself by using his official position to secure or create advantages for that corporation by means of providing inside agency information and instructions to an individual affiliated with the corporation.  In doing so, Young violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d), which prohibits the use of ones official position to obtain financial or other advantages for oneself.  Young also violated KRS 11A.040(1) by knowingly disclosing and using confidential information acquired in the course of his official duties to further his own economic interest when he provided inside agency information and instructions and obtained favorable treatment with regard to administrative actions of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services for the individual affiliated with the corporation regulated by his agency. 
In a Settlement Agreement, Young admitted that he violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d), KRS 11A.040(1), and KRS 11A.045(1) as alleged, agreed to pay a $5,000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal. 
Attachments: Attachment
Executive Branch Ethics Commission vs. Patrick Yates11-001
That during his course of employment with the Department of Highways, Transportation Cabinet, Patrick Yates violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using his official position to obtain financial gain for himself and to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself in derogation of the public interest at large by means of misappropriating public funds.  Specifically, Yates used a state credit card to obtain fuel for non-state owned vehicles at a total cost of $758.10, for which he received half of the cost of the fuel in cash from the operators of the vehicles. 
In a Final Order the Commission adopted the Recommended Order of Default Judgment issued by the hearing officer assigned to the case, finding that Yates violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) as charged, and ordered that Yates receive a public reprimand and pay a $5,000 penalty.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission vs. Paula Daniels-Music11-007
That during her course of employment with the Department for Medicaid Services, Cabinet for Health and Family Services, Paula Daniels-Music violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a) by using her official position to influence matters that involved a substantial conflict of interest between her personal and private interests and her duties in the public interest.  Specifically, Daniels-Music failed to abstain from working on matters involving a provider regulated by her agency on which she knew that her husband and mother, employees of the provider, were involved.  In addition, immediately after leaving the employment of the Department for Medicaid Services, Cabinet for Health and Family Services, Daniels-Music violated KRS 11A.040(9) by representing a business before her former state agency on matters in which she was directly involved during her state employment.  Specifically, Daniels-Music left employment with the state and immediately began representing the above-referenced provider on all matters involving her former agency, including specific matters with which she had been directly involved as an employee of the Department for Medicaid Services.
In a Settlement Agreement, Daniels-Music admitted that she violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a) and KRS 11A.040(9) as alleged, agreed to pay a $2,000 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal. 
Attachments: Attachment
expand Issuing Year : 2010 ‎(11)
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Basil Turbyfill07-108
That a former Deputy Secretary of the Personnel Cabinet, and former Director of the Governor’s Office of Personnel and Efficiency, violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (b), and (c) by using or attempting to use his official position and influence by instructing the Executive Director of the Governor’s Office for Local Development (“GOLD”) to “get rid” of some of GOLD’s higher paid merit employees on the basis of their political contributions; violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (b), and (d) by placing private political interests above his duties as an employee of the Commonwealth of Kentucky when he attempted to influence officials in the Office of Human Resource Management, Cabinet for Health and Family Services to give employment advantages to certain individuals by instructing the officials to speed up the “personnel initiative” process of placing individuals recommended by legislators, county judges and others who supported the Governor in merit positions based on the source of recommendation and the applicant’s political support of the Governor rather than on the applicant’s qualifications, referencing the Transportation Cabinet’s method of doing so as an example for them to follow; violated KRS 11A.020(1)(b) and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to influence a public agency and to give advantages to certain individuals in derogation of the public interest at large by directing personnel of various agencies to hire merit system applicants based on private political interests rather than qualifications or agency personnel preference with disregard to personnel statutes or regulations governing the merit system hiring procedures; and violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a) by placing private political interests above his duties as an employee of the Commonwealth of Kentucky when, as the effective director of the “personnel initiative,” he aided and abetted the hiring, appointment, promotion, demotion, or transfer of individuals based on political considerations rather than qualifications. 
In a Settlement Agreement, while stating that he was not aware or did not know that his actions were in violation of KRS Chapter 11A, the employee agreed that the factual allegations as set forth in the Commission’s Initiating Order, if proven true at a hearing, could result in a determination of multiple violations of KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (b) and (d) as stated in the Commission’s Initiating Order.  The employee agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $1,500, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Cathy Miller09-003
That a former employee of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using her official position to give herself a financial gain; and to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for herself in derogation of the public interest at large by using state time and equipment in selling and distributing illegal copies of movies for financial gain.
In a Settlement Agreement, the employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.020(1)(d) as alleged, agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $100, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The parties agreed that there was insufficient evidence that the former employee violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c).
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Charles Wilburn10-004
That an employee of the Energy and Environment Cabinet, Division of Forestry, violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (c), and (d) by using his official position, state resources, and state time to give himself or others a financial gain; and to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself or others in derogation of the public interest at large by using state time and resources in attempting to bid on a tree removal project at a state university during work hours while utilizing state equipment for financial gain.
In a Settlement Agreement, the employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (c), and (d) as alleged, agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $250, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Crystal Murray Ducker10-002
That a former Deputy Secretary for the Transportation Cabinet violated KRS 11A.040 (7) by: accepting employment, compensation, or other economic benefit from a company that does business with the state in a matter in which she was directly involved during the last thirty-six (36) months of her tenure.
In a Settlement Agreement, the former employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.040(7) as alleged, agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $500, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Kenneth Poloski10-001
That an employee for the Department of Highways in the Transportation Cabinet violated KRS 11A.040(4) by enjoying a contract granted by his agency as a subcontractor to perform a portion of the contract; and further violated KRS 11A.040(3) by monitoring in his official position the workers of his private company in performance of services to fulfill a portion of a contract with his own agency.
In a Settlement Agreement, the former employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.040(3) and KRS 11A.040(4), as alleged, agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $250, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Melissa Sachs09-004
That a former employee of the Finance and Administration Cabinet failed to file a completed 2008 Statement of Financial Disclosure within the time period required by statute for the portion of calendar year 2008 during which she was employed, in violation of KRS 11A.050(1), (3)(f) and (l). 
In a Settlement Agreement, the former employee admitted to
violating KRS 11A.050(1), (3)(f) and (l) as alleged, agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $100, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Richard Murgatroyd07-115
That a former Deputy Secretary of the Transportation Cabinet used or attempted to use his official position to facilitate the transfer and demotion of a state classified (merit) employee without cause, and based on the employee’s political affiliation or opinion and past political positions in violation of KRS 11A.020 (1) (a) and (b); violated KRS 11A.020 (1) (a) and (b) by using or attempting to use his official position to precipitate the retirement of a state classified (merit) system employee by means of a temporary assignment, for the purpose of making the employee’s merit position available for a person who supported political agenda of the administration; violated KRS 11A.020 (1) (a), (b) and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to influence a public agency in the promotion an individual to a state classified (merit) system position in the Transportation Cabinet and give the individual an advantage over other more qualified applicants based on the individual’s political views and support of the administration rather than on his qualifications; violated KRS 11A.020 (1) (a), (b), and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to influence a public agency by creating a state classified (merit) position in the Transportation Cabinet identical to the position already held by the employee and then appointing the employee to that new position without considering other candidates in order to circumvent the merit system and give the employee a higher salary; violated KRS 11A.020 (1) (a), (b), and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to influence a public agency in the appointment of a supporter of the administration to a state classified (merit) system position in the Transportation Cabinet and give the individual an advantage over other more qualified applicants based solely on the individual’s political activities on behalf of the administration rather than her qualifications; violated KRS 11A.020 (1) (a) and (b) by using or attempting to use his official position to facilitate the transfer of a state classified (merit) system employee of the Transportation Cabinet, for the purpose of creating a vacant position to ultimately be filled by a family member of a strong supporter of the political agenda of the administration; violated KRS 11A.020 (1) (a), (b), and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to influence a public agency in the appointment of an individual based on his family relationship to a strong supporter of the political agenda of the administration, rather than on the qualifications of the individual, to a state classified (merit) system position in the Transportation Cabinet;  violated KRS 11A.020 (1) (a), (b), and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to influence a public agency in the appointment of an individual based on his family relationship to a high ranking individual, rather than on his qualifications, to a state classified (merit) system position in the Transportation Cabinet created for this purpose; violated KRS 11A.020 (1) (b) and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to influence a public agency and to give advantages to certain individuals in derogation of the public interest at large by facilitating the systematic preselection or approval of individuals, based on private political interests rather than qualifications, and directing that they be placed in merit system positions or promoted with disregard to personnel statutes or regulations governing the merit system hiring process; and violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a) by placing private political interests above his duties as an employee of the Commonwealth of Kentucky when he facilitated the hiring, appointment, promotion, demotion, or transfer of individuals based on political considerations rather than qualifications.
In a Settlement Agreement, while stating that he was not aware or did not know that his actions were in violation of KRS Chapter 11A, the employee agreed that the factual allegations as set forth in the Commission’s Initiating Order, if proven true at a hearing, could result in a determination of multiple violations of KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (b) and (d) as stated in the Commission’s Initiating Order.  The employee agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $2,000, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Sharon Harris10-005
That an employee, during her course of employment as a Nurse Administrator in the Department for Public Health, Cabinet for Health and Family Services, violated KRS 11A.045(1) by living rent free in a residence owned by a corporation regulated by the Office of Inspector General, Cabinet for Health and Family Services.
The Commission adopted the recommended order of default issued by the hearing officer, finding that the former employee violated KRS 11A.045(1) as charged, imposing a fine of $1,500 and imposing a public reprimand.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Stephen Ray Isaacs07-27
That a former employee of the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using his official position to give himself a financial gain and an advantage in derogation of the public at large by misappropriating fine payments collected from convicted poachers that should have been deposited with the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
In a Settlement Agreement, the former employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) as alleged, agreed to pay a $500 civil penalty, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.  The former employee was also ordered by a Federal Court to pay restitution in the amount of $9,600 to the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. William Huffman03-103
That an employee, during his course of employment as a Staff Attorney for the Division of Worker’s Compensation Funds, in the Labor Cabinet, violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to obtain financial gain for himself, and to give himself an advantage in derogation of the public interest by claiming sick leave from his employer while working on cases in his private legal practice; and violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to obtain financial gain for himself and to give himself an advantage in derogation of the public interest by misusing state owned equipment while working on cases in his private legal practice.
The Commission adopted the recommended order of the hearing officer, finding that the former employee violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) as charged, and imposing a fine of $2,500 and imposing a public reprimand.  The former employee unsuccessfully appealed the final order of the Commission to the Franklin Circuit Court, the Court of Appeals, and requested discretionary review by the Supreme Court.  The final order of the Commission was upheld at all levels of appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. William Nighbert08-027
That a former Secretary for the Transportation Cabinet violated KRS 11A.050(3)(e) by failing to disclose an ownership interest in a corporation on the 2007 Statement of Financial Disclosure filed with the Commission.
In a Settlement Agreement, the employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.050(3)(e) as alleged, agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $500, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
expand Issuing Year : 2009 ‎(13)
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Amy Hall08-025
That a former employee in the Kentucky Department of Parks violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using her official position to obtain financial gain for herself; and to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for herself or others in derogation of the public interest at large by misappropriating public funds.
In a Settlement Agreement, the former employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.020(1)(c)and (d) as alleged, agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $500, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Andrea Radford08-003
That a former Consumer Complaint Investigator for the Office of Insurance violated KRS 11A.040(5) by accepting $300 in payment from a consumer claimant for performance of her official duties.
In a Settlement Agreement, the employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.040(5) as alleged, agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $300, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Betty Whitaker09-001
That a former Mine Safety Analyst I in the Department of Natural Resources, Energy and Environment Cabinet, violated KRS 11A.020(1)(b), (c), and (d) by falsifying mine reports and failing to fulfill her job duties over a one year period while receiving compensation.
In a Settlement Agreement, the employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.020(1)(b), (c), and (d) as alleged, agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $1,500, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Billy Carr08-024
That a former Division Director II in the Environmental and Public Protection Cabinet failed to timely file a 2007 Statement of Financial Disclosure within the time period required by statute for the portion of the calendar year 2007 during which he was employed by the agency, in violation of KRS 11A.050(1)(b).
The Commission determined that the former employee violated KRS 11A.050(1)(b) as charged and imposed a civil penalty of $1,000.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Danny Druen06-110
That a former employee of the Transportation Cabinet violated KRS 11A.020(1)(b) and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to influence a public agency and to give advantages to certain individuals in derogation of the public interest at large by facilitating the systematic pre-selection or approval of individuals, based on private political interests rather than qualifications, and directing that they be placed in merit system positions or promoted with disregard to personnel statutes or regulations governing the merit system hiring procedures; violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a) by placing private political interests above his duties as an employee of the Commonwealth of Kentucky when he facilitated the hiring, appointment, promotion, demotion, or transfer of individuals based on political considerations rather than qualifications; violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (b), and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to influence a public agency by drafting and maintaining a “hit list” comprised of both classified (merit) system employees of the Transportation Cabinet and unclassified (non-merit) employees of the Transportation Cabinet, for the purpose of identifying these employees for adverse personnel actions (terminations, reversions, reassignments, and involuntary transfers) based in large part on their political affiliation or opinion; violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a) and (b) by using or attempting to use his official position to facilitate the involuntary transfer and demotion of a state classified (merit) system employee of the Transportation Cabinet, without cause, based on political affiliation or opinion; violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (b), and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to influence a public agency in the appointment of a state classified (merit) system position in the Transportation Cabinet and give her an advantage over other more qualified individuals based solely on her political connections and support of the current administration rather than her qualifications; violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (b), and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to influence a public agency in the appointment of an individual based on his family relationship to a close supporter of the political agenda of the current administration, rather than his qualifications, to a state classified (merit) system position in the Transportation Cabinet; violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (b), and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to influence a public agency in the appointment of an individual based on his family relationship to a high ranking state official, rather than his qualifications, to a state classified (merit) system position in the Transportation Cabinet created for this purpose; violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a) and (b) by using or attempting to use his official position by participating in the involuntary dismissal of a state classified (merit) system employee of the Transportation Cabinet, based on the employee’s political affiliation or opinion; violated KRS 11A.020(1)(d) by using or attempting to use his official position to access official documents in order to alter them so that they might not be used as evidence against him or others in legal proceedings; and violated KRS 11A.020(1)(d) by using or attempting to use his official position to influence a state classified (merit) system employee of the Transportation Cabinet, to alter or falsify her future testimony in official proceedings so that her testimony might not be used as evidence against him or others.
In a Settlement Agreement, while stating that he was not aware or did not know that his actions were in violation of KRS Chapter 11A, the employee agreed that the factual allegations as set forth in the Commission’s Initiating Order, if proven true at a hearing, could result in a determination of multiple violations of KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (b) and (d) as stated in the Commission’s Initiating Order.  The employee agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $2,500, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Darrell Brock07-107
That a former Commissioner of the Governor’s Office for Local Development violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (b), and (c) by using or attempting to use his official position and influence to pressure the Executive Directive of the Office for Human Resource Management, Cabinet for Health and Family Services, the agency’s appointing authority, to direct that an individual be placed in a merit position, based on political support for the current administration, in disregard of the fact that the individual continually interviewed poorly and was not the best qualified person for any of the merit positions for which she had interviewed.
In a Settlement Agreement, while stating that he was not aware or did not know that his actions were in violation of KRS Chapter 11A, the employee agreed that the factual allegations as set forth in the Commission’s Initiating Order, if proven true at a hearing, could result in a determination of a violation of KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (b) and (d) as stated in the Commission’s Initiating Order.  The employee agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $1,000, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. David Toborowsky08-028
That a former Special Assistant for the Cabinet for Health and Family Services violated KRS 11A.050(1) by failing to timely file a 2007 Statement of Financial Disclosure within the time period required by statute.
In a Settlement Agreement, the former employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.050(1) as alleged, agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $100, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. James Adams07-106
That a former Deputy Secretary of the Transportation Cabinet violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a) and (b) by using or attempting to use his official position by participating in the involuntary dismissal of a state classified (merit) system employee of the Transportation Cabinet, based on political affiliation or opinion.  Such action presented a substantial conflict between the employee’s personal political interests and his duty in the public interest in disregard of the statutes and regulations governing the merit hiring system.
In a Settlement Agreement, while stating that he was not aware or did not know that his actions were in violation of KRS Chapter 11A, the employee agreed that the factual allegations as set forth in the Commission’s Initiating Order, if proven true at a hearing, could result in a determination of a violation of KRS 11A.020(1)(a) and (b) as stated in the Commission’s Initiating Order.  The employee agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $1,000, received a public reprimand, and
waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Leela Flowers08-008
That a former employee of the Office of Insurance violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) by using her official position or office to obtain financial gain for herself by depositing funds in the amount of $2,068.66 collected for the Kentucky Employees Charitable Campaign into her personal bank account, expending the funds for personal use, and then failing to reimburse the funds for a period of five months; and violated KRS 11A.040(2) by knowingly receiving an interest or profit arising from the use or loan of public funds in her hands or to be raised through any state agency when she deposited public funds in the amount of $2,068.66 raised through the Office of Insurance on behalf of the Kentucky Employees Charitable Campaign into her personal bank account.
The Commission determined that the former employee violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and KRS 11A.040(2) and imposed a civil penalty in the amount of $250.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Paul Blanton08-012
That a former employee of the Environmental and Public Protection Cabinet violated KRS 11A.040(7) and (9) by accepting employment, compensation, or other economic benefit from a private company that does business with the state in a matter in which he was directly involved during the last 36 months of his tenure, within six months following the termination of his employment; and by representing the company within one year of the termination of his state employment before a state agency in a matter in which he was directly involved during the last 36 months of his tenure.
In a Settlement Agreement, the employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.040(7) and (9) as alleged, agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $1,000, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Tara Gaines08-29
That a former employee of the Office of Employment and Training within the Department for Workforce Investment, Education Cabinet, violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using her official position to obtain financial gain for herself; and to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for herself in derogation of the public interest at large by misappropriating public funds.
In a Settlement Agreement, the employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) as alleged, agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $250, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Todd Alfrey08-011
That a former employee of the Environmental and Public Protection Cabinet violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to give himself a financial gain and an advantage by having a hotel charge the agency by which he was employed for his hotel stay while he was on approved leave.
Upon receipt of additional information, the Commission dismissed the charge.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Tommy Hayes08-026
That a former employee of Fleet Management in the Finance Cabinet violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using his official position to give himself a financial gain; and to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself in derogation of the public interest at large by using state time and equipment in producing, selling, and distributing illegal copies of music and movies.
In a Settlement Agreement, the former employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) as alleged, agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $250, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
expand Issuing Year : 2008 ‎(8)
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Bert David Cox07-105
That an employee of the Kentucky Board of Engineers and Land Surveyors, violated KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) by using his official position to obtain financial gain for himself and to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself in derogation of the public interest at large by regularly receiving payment from his agency for hours worked per day, when in fact he habitually worked fewer hours per day, or at times did not come to work at all.
In a Settlement Agreement, the former employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) as alleged, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Dennis Mills07-113
That a former Transportation Cabinet employee accepted outside employment with an engineering firm that was doing business with his agency in violation of KRS 11A.040(10); acted as a representative of the outside employer or its clients before his own state agency in violation of KRS 11A.020(2); and used his official position to obtain financial gain for himself and to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself in derogation of the public interest at large by getting paid in his official capacity during time he was completing work for his outside employer by claiming sick leave, in violation of KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d).
The Commission determined that the former employee violated KRS 11A.040(10), KRS 11A.020(2), and KRS 11A.020(1)(c) and (d) as charged and imposed a civil penalty of $3,000.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Marc Williams07-103
That a former Commissioner of Highways in the Transportation Cabinet violated KRS 11A.020(1)(b) and (d) by using or attempting to use his influence and/or official position in directing the State Highway Engineer to use or attempt to use his influence and/or official position to influence Consultant Selection Committee members for the benefit of a certain outside consulting firm during an open selection process relating to a Transportation Cabinet project.
The Commission adopted the recommendation of the hearing officer that there was not clear and convincing evidence that the former Commissioner of Highways violated KRS 11A.020(1)(b) and (d).
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Michael Martindale16-004
In a Final Order issued by the Commission, Mr. Martindale was found by clear and convincing evidence to have committed one count in violation of the Code of Ethics that occurred during the course of his employment as an HVAC Inspector with the Department of Housing (Department), Building, and Construction, Public Protection Cabinet.  Specifically, on or about September 11, 2015, Martindale was found to have used his official position to access confidential and personal contact information of HVAC licensee’s regulated by the Department.  Martindale accessed this information by running a report of all licensees in the Department’s internal Jurisdiction Online System. Martindale subsequently passed this information on to his wife who was starting an online HVAC Education Service called TRADETECH.  The confidential contact information was used by TRADETECH to solicit licensees for the business.  As of April 27, 2016, Department records reflected that TRADETECH’S online classes had been used over 800 times by licensees regulated by the Department.
Pursuant to the Final Order, Mr. Martindale is order to pay a $5000.00 civil penalty and receive a public reprimand.  Mr. Martindale has a right to appeal to the Franklin Circuit Court. 
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Randall Smith07-110
That a former environmental inspector for the Environmental and Public Protection Cabinet used his official position to obtain financial gain for himself and to secure or create privileges, exemptions, advantages, or treatment for himself in derogation of the public at large by unlawfully extorting $500 cash, and future monthly payments of $500, from a surface-mine owner whose operation the employee inspected in the performance of his official duties in violation of KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (c), and (d).
The Commission determined that the former employee violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a), (c), and (d) as charged, and imposed a civil fine of $5,000.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Robert Wilson07-109
That a former Director in the Commerce Cabinet, and former Deputy Secretary, Personnel Cabinet, violated KRS 11A.020(1)(b) and (d) by using or attempting to use his official position to influence a public agency and to give advantages to certain individuals in derogation of the public interest at large by directing personnel of various agencies to hire merit system applicants based on private political interests rather than qualifications or agency personnel preference with disregard to personnel statutes and regulations governing the merit system hiring procedures; and violated KRS 11A.020(1)(a) by placing private political interests above his duties as an employee of the Commonwealth of Kentucky when, as the effective co-director of the “personnel initiative,” he aided and abetted the hiring, appointment, promotion, demotion, or transfer of individuals based on political considerations rather than qualifications.
In a Settlement Agreement, the former employee admitted that the factual allegations against him, if proven true at a hearing, could result in a determination of a violation of KRS 11A.020(1) (a), (b), and (d); agreed to receive a public reprimand; and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Robert Winlock07-111
That a former inspector for the Office of Consumer Protection within the Office of the Attorney General accepted significant financial benefits relating to his trade-in/purchase of used cars amounting to a value greater than $25 on each occasion from a business regulated by the agency and division by which the employee was employed and against which numerous complaints had been filed by the public, in violation of KRS 11A.045(1).
In a Settlement Agreement, the former employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.045(1) as alleged, agreed to pay a civil penalty in the amount of $1,000, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments:
Executive Branch Ethics Commission v. Ronnie Earlywine07-112
That a Highway Superintendent in the Department of Highways, Transportation Cabinet, used his official position to secure or create privileges or advantages for himself in derogation of the public interest at large.  Such conduct included the misuse of state time, equipment, and manpower for personal gain by himself and employees under his supervision, in violation of KRS 11A.020(1)(a) and (d).
In a Settlement Agreement, the employee admitted to violating KRS 11A.020(1)(a) and (d) as alleged, agreed to pay a civil fine in the amount of $1,000, received a public reprimand, and waived any right to appeal.
Attachments: